Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power

Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power

James McGrath Morris

Language: English

Pages: 592

ISBN: 006079870X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power

James McGrath Morris

Language: English

Pages: 592

ISBN: 006079870X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In nineteenth-century industrial America, while Carnegie provided the steel, Rockefeller the oil, Morgan the money, and Vanderbilt the railroads, Pulitzer ushered in the modern mass media.

James McGrath Morris chronicles the epic story of Joseph Pulitzer, a Jewish Hungarian immigrant who amassed great wealth and extraordinary power during his remarkable rise through American politics and journalism. Based on years of research and newly discovered documents, Pulitzer is a classic, magisterial biography. It is a gripping portrait of the media baron who transformed American journalism into a medium of mass consumption and immense influence, and of the grueling legal battles he endured for freedom of the press that changed the landscape of American newspapers and politics.

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cooperation secret. While the men negotiated, John Norris lunched with Adolph Ochs, who three years earlier had bought the money-losing New York Times. The paper was making large gains in circulation since it had dropped its price and adopted Ochs’s style of objective reporting, expressed by the paper’s new motto “All the News That’s Fit to Print.” (The motto of Ochs’s paper in Chattanooga had been “It Does Not Soil the Breakfast Cloth.”) Ochs told Norris in confidence that Carvalho had also

competed for annual monetary awards in a number of categories such as best news story and best writing. Editors were not excluded. Pulitzer held competitions for best headline and best copyediting, as well. Pulitzer selected Columbia for his munificence because of its location in the capital of newspaper publishing and because it already had a School of Mines. (“Why not also have a School of Journalism,” he said.) But if Columbia seemed uninterested, Pulitzer said he would try Yale. “My own

on account of his opposition to their schemes in the last legislature,” reported the morning’s edition of the Missouri Republican. “Mr. Bell is confident of being elected by a two hundred majority.” In the morning, the extent of Brown’s victory astonished everyone. He carried the state by a huge margin. Liberal Republicans were ecstatic. The election of their man as governor and the 88 percent vote they garnered for the amendments were a rebuke to Radicalism and, in particular, to the Grant

he asked in one letter. “I really do not like the glare, fear the fire. I have been burned and too often before both actually and metaphorically speaking, both internally and externally.” Another closed with similar reluctance. “What! This is going a little too fast, is it not?” In May, Tunstall put an end to Pulitzer’s pursuit. Pulitzer called her letter cruel. “It has not only unnerved my soul but blasted my hopes,” he wrote. “Your terrible revelation has put an awful chasm between us. “Is

Ostensibly, Kate and Joseph were off on a two-month honeymoon. But Kate soon learned, or may already have deduced from Joseph’s frenetic business pursuits on the eve of their wedding, that her husband’s attention would never be hers alone, even on a honeymoon. His mind constantly churned with political and business schemes. As soon as they reached England, Joseph dived into the newspapers, making careful note of everything he read, and buttonholed all he met to ask endless questions. Having

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