Rags and Riches: Kids in the Time of Charles Dickens (Magic Tree House)

Rags and Riches: Kids in the Time of Charles Dickens (Magic Tree House)

Mary Pope Osborne

Language: English

Pages: 128

ISBN: 037586010X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Rags and Riches: Kids in the Time of Charles Dickens (Magic Tree House)

Mary Pope Osborne

Language: English

Pages: 128

ISBN: 037586010X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Track the facts with Jack and Annie!
 
When Jack and Annie got back from their adventure in Magic Tree House #44: A Ghost Tale for Christmas Time, they had lots of questions. Why did Charles Dickens write A Christmas Carol? How did he help the poor? What jobs did poor Victorian kids have? How did rich kids spend their time? Find out the answers to these questions and more as Jack and Annie track the facts.

Filled with up-to-date information, photos, illustrations, and fun tidbits from Jack and Annie, the Magic Tree House Fact Trackers are the perfect way for kids to find out more about the topics they discovered in their favorite Magic Tree House adventures. And teachers can use Fact Trackers alongside their Magic Tree House fiction companions to meet common core text pairing needs.

Have more fun with Jack and Annie on the Magic Tree House website at MagicTreeHouse.com!

Class War: The Privatization of Childhood

Beware Dangerism!

The Cult of LEGO

Cinderella Smith: The Super Secret Mystery

How Children Learn the Meaning of Words

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hard. His books made people laugh and cry … sometimes at the same time. Often Charles signed his works with the name Boz. It was his youngest brother’s nickname. When Charles was a little boy, he saw a beautiful house in the country. Its name was Gad’s Hill. Charles fell in love with this house. His father told him that if he worked hard, he could buy a house just like it. Charles worked so hard that he was able to buy Gad’s Hill. He lived there until he died. Charles Dickens’s books

Together, we find facts in the [Fact Trackers] to extend the learning introduced in the fictional companions. Researching and planning classroom activities, such as our class Olympics based on facts found in Ancient Greece and the Olympics, help create a genuine love for learning!” —Paula H., teacher Text copyright © 2010 by Mary Pope Osborne and Natalie Pope Boyce Illustrations copyright © 2010 by Sal Murdocca Cover photograph copyright © Royal Photographic Society/Science and Society

reached twenty-five. Some children worked as trappers. Trappers sat at the doors of the mine, holding a rope tied to the door. They had to open the doors so coal carts could get through and to let in fresh air. Sitting alone in the dark was tiring. If the trappers fell asleep, a coal cart could crush their legs. Kids who worked as drawers had the worst job of all. Drawers had chains tied to their waists that were attached to coal carts. They crawled on all fours through the narrow tunnels,

Mary Collins • Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor by Russell Freedman • Kids During the Industrial Revolution by Lisa A. Wroble • Queen Victoria, First Book series, by Robert Green Many museums have exhibits on Victorian children. Although Dickens lived in England, there are museums in the United States with facts about children in the Industrial Revolution. These places can help you learn more about life in Charles Dickens’s time. When you go to a museum: 1.

schoolhistory.co.uk/primarylinks/victorian • www.vam.ac.uk/moc/childrens_lives/health_&_work/index.html • www.vam.ac.uk/moc/childrens_lives/parlour_games/index.html Albert, Prince Barnardo, Thomas John bathing suits bicycles, 3.1, 6.1 Big Ben books for children cars, 1.1, 6.1, 6.2 child labor, 1.1, 1.2, 4.1, 6.1 chimney sweeps cholera, 3.1, 5.1 Christmas Carol, A, 2.1, 2.2 climbing boys coal, 3.1, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 costermongers crime crossing boys Dickens, Charles,

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