Refiguring Prose Style: Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy

Refiguring Prose Style: Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy

T. R. Johnson, Thomas Pace

Language: English

Pages: 327

ISBN: 2:00036811

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Refiguring Prose Style: Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy

T. R. Johnson, Thomas Pace

Language: English

Pages: 327

ISBN: 2:00036811

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Style is of vital practical interest to college writing teachers, because everyone has to teach it one way or another. Yet for about two decades, the theoretical discussion of how to address prose style in teaching college writing has been stuck, with style standing in as a proxy for other stakes in the theory wars. A consequence of the impasse is that a theory of style itself has not been well articulated. In Refiguring Prose Style, Johnson and Pace suggest that move the field toward a better consensus will require establishing style as a clearer subject of inquiry. Accordingly, this collection takes up a comprehensive study of the subject. The hope of the essays here---focusing on historical, aesthetic, practical, and theoretical issues---is to reawaken composition studies to the possibilities of style, and in turn, to rejuvenate a great many classrooms.

The Travel Writer's Handbook: How to Write - and Sell - Your Own Travel Experiences

Academic Writing in Context: Implications and Applications

Story Engineering

Revision And Self-Editing (Write Great Fiction)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

composition changing so much as a field from 1973 to today, was the decline in attention to style due only to an inability to theorize classroom pedagogies? Might other factors—changing interests in specific research methodologies, changes in the rhetorical stance of the field—not also play a role? I wondered if: 1. The shift away from empirical or quantitative research methods toward qualitative studies that began with the 1980s reaction to cognitive research methods, together with the literary

combining, imitation, and Francis Christensen’s generative rhetoric. But, in the early 1980s, as composition moved into the major phase of its professionalization, this sort of pedagogy seemed to lack the sort of high theoretical basis then becoming fashionable and, rooted as it was in exercises, the pedagogy didn’t offer students the sort of meaningful rhetorical context that seemed indispensable to nurturing their abilities. The result, of course, is that many of today’s composition teachers

students’ sentences even while improving the evaluation of their work as a whole. 138 REFIGURING PROSE STYLE That is why, at last, we should not ignore the one great reason why “grammar hope” persists: that’s why, after all, there even are college composition courses, which in turn is why there even is a field of rhetoric and composition. After all is said and done, no matter how much there is to be said and done, we have work because there is an enormous demand for better sentences. We do

Recently, a colleague and I were discussing my project on style. I said I thought students could write better prose if they were taught more explicitly about how nuances of language play an important, if indirect, role in argument. “Au contraire,” said my colleague, “what students need to learn is more rigorous argument.” Our conversation raised several issues, not the least of which is the perception writing instructors have of style. Style, it is assumed, is separate from the reasoning that

culture use it. Yet because people learn language through individual experiences, it stands to reason that they use and respond to it in individual ways. People want to be understood; they want their meanings to affect other people. A person’s unique knowledge of language must somehow conform to cultural expectations if that person wants to participate in conversations. If we accept this premise, then we can examine language use for how it meets cultural expectations for communication. According

Download sample

Download