Roberte Ce Soir and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (French Literature)

Roberte Ce Soir and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (French Literature)

Pierre Klossowski

Language: English

Pages: 225

ISBN: 0394172574

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Roberte Ce Soir and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (French Literature)

Pierre Klossowski

Language: English

Pages: 225

ISBN: 0394172574

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Together these two novels comprise the most fascinating, obsessive, and erotic works of contemporary Frech fiction. Like the works of Georges Bataille, and those of the Marquis de Sade before him, Klossowski's fiction explores the connections between the mind and the body through a lens of sexuality. Both of these novels feature Octave, an elderly cleric; his striking young wife Roberte; and their nephew, Antoine in a series of sexual situations. But Klossowski's books are about theology as well, and this merging of the sexual with the religious makes this book one of the most painstakingly baroque and intellectual novels of our time.

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of the Son sacrificed by the Father, this Father who is nothing else than fate reconciled, or not? In fact, the only miracle I find in the story of His life is that He, the enemy of the priests and of their god, He, the first of the atheists, He was made into the Son of the monstrous idol He spurned beneath His feet during the short while He lived on earth. He, the comforter of the poor, they twist His words: you shall always have the poor among you, but you shall not always have Me— that is, to

rendering the spectacle life offers itself, what does this spectacle show us if not life reiterating itself in an attempt to right itself in the midst of its fall, as if holding its breath in a momentary ap­ prehension of its origins; but reiteration of life by life would be hopeless without the simulacrum produced by the artist who, from reproducing this spectacle, manages to rescue himself from reiteration: such was, morally speaking, Flau­ bert’s effort in his Sentimental Education. T o talk

him; "keep going,” I added, pointing to the door. But he had already folded me in his arms: "I have nothing more to lose,” he said, "unless it’s you.” And he lay his hand on my hip, from where it went resolutely to my behind. "This,” he cried, "belongs to m e!” At the same moment Antoine entered to present himself to Vittorio. By then I was at the end of my tether. "Antoine,” I said, the while not quite knowing what I was doing, "here is Monsieur de Santa-Sede who is going to devote his attention

Lycée Condorcet, and not far from the Gare St. Lazare. This installation has some of the features of a bathing establishment and, si­ multaneously, of a tearoom and smacks of no telling just what sort of a meeting place for women only. Downstairs, a step or two from the washrooms— comfortable and luxurious — is gathered a team of Spanish, Italian, or Algerian shoeshine boys. W hen all is said and done, their presence in such a place could be considered unwarranted; and so they are only tolerated

with her inactuality, it is without her being aware of it we enter into relation with the inactual Roberte. To date, you have known the inactual Roberte only in her "attentive and severe sister, unbelieving and austere” guise, and I in her guise of the dutiful wife. It’s none other than the former I have de­ nounced to the pure spirit, it is unbeknown to the latter the pure spirit is going to actualize what Roberte is alone in knowing with him. In fact, Roberte does not at all know in relation to

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