Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2012

Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2012

Roger Ebert

Language: English

Pages: 792

ISBN: 1449408133

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2012

Roger Ebert

Language: English

Pages: 792

ISBN: 1449408133

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Since 1986, Roger Ebert’s annual collection has been recognized as the preeminent source for full-length critical movie reviews.

The only film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize, Roger Ebert collects his reviews from the last 30 months in Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2012. Forbes Magazine described Ebert as the "most powerful pundit in America." In January 2011, he and his wife, Chaz, launched Ebert Presents at the Movies, a weekly public television program in the tradition that he and Gene Siskel began 35 years earlier.

Since 1986, each edition of Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook has presented full-length movie reviews, with interviews, essays, tributes, journal entries, and "Questions for the Movie Answer Man," and new entries in his popular Movie Glossary. Inside Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2012, readers can expect to find every movie review Ebert has written from January 2009 to July 2011, including The Social Network, Waiting for Superman, Inception, The King's Speech, My Dog Tulip, The Human Centipede, and more. Also included in the Yearbook are:

* In-depth interviews with newsmakers and celebrities, such as John Waters and Justin Timberlake.

* Memorial tributes to those in the film industry who have passed away, such as Blake Edwards, Tony Curtis, and Arthur Penn. 

* Essays on the Oscars and reports from the Cannes and Toronto Film Festivals.

The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World (Bradford Books)

Dude, You're Gonna Be a Dad!

Meanwhile There Are Letters: The Correspondence of Eudora Welty and Ross Macdonald

Cracking the New Job Market: The 7 Rules for Getting Hired in Any Economy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You may know that Penelope Ann Miller is white, and that Corbin Bleu (star of all the High School Musical films) is biracial. Why do I mention this? Because the movie makes a big point of it, even providing an absent black father Cale seeks out, perhaps because then, God help us, the father can turn up at the end of the Big Race and nod approvingly. Why not simply provide the kid with two parents? Because the Single Mom is also a beloved cliché, you say? Two for the price of one. Anyway, all

life is? The father is absent-minded but means well, the kids are normal, the mother is trying to juggle parental duties and her plans for a career. This could be countless families. Why do we require a movie about this particular one? The film stars Uma Thurman, doing her best with a role that may offer her less than any other in her career, even though she’s constantly onscreen. She’s Eliza, who takes her laptop along to the playground to work on her blog, which is just a blog. She’s not

his actors are effective at playing personalities, not symbols. Kate Beckinsale is Rachel Armstrong, the reporter for the Capital Sun-Times. Vera Farmiga is Erica Van Doren, the outed spy. Matt Dillon plays prosecutor Patton Dubois, obviously intended as U.S. prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald, now so involved in the case of our fascinating former Illinois governor. Alda is the high-priced Washington lawyer hired by the newspaper to defend Rachel. Angela Bassett is the newspaper’s editor, under

pretty well, especially Nayda (Jaclyn Jose), the daughter, whose son is the little boy, and whose mother, Nanay Flor (Gina Pareno), is due in court for her husband’s divorce hearing. A strong matriarch, she fiercely wants to be rid of the man. And there is another worry: Merly (Mercedes Cabral), girlfriend of the cousin/projectionist Alan (Coco Martin), has announced she is pregnant, so there will be the expense of a wedding no one wants. In a film so immersed in sex, there is little actual sex.

uses camera placement and movement instead, circling the makeshift jury table and following jurors as they wander the room. A sparrow flies in through a window, and its fluttering and chirping is a reminder that the jurors, too, feel imprisoned. Going in I knew what the story was about, how it would progress, and how it would end. Mikhalkov keeps all of that (writer Rose shares a screen credit), but he has made a new film with its own original characters and stories, and after all, it’s not how

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