Routledge Handbook of Modern Korean History (Routledge Handbooks)

Routledge Handbook of Modern Korean History (Routledge Handbooks)

Language: English

Pages: 408

ISBN: 0415739314

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Routledge Handbook of Modern Korean History (Routledge Handbooks)

Language: English

Pages: 408

ISBN: 0415739314

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century when Korea became entangled in the world of modern imperialism and the old social, economic and political order began to change; this handbook brings together cutting edge scholarship on major themes in Korean History. Contributions by experts in the field cover the Late Choson and Colonial periods, Korea’s partition and the diverging paths of North and South Korea.

Topics covered include:

  • The division of Korea
  • Religion
  • Competing imperialisms
  • Economic change
  • War and rebellions
  • Nationalism
  • Gender
  • North Korea Under Kim Jong Il
  • Global Korea

The Handbook provides a stimulating introduction to the most important themes within the subject area, and is an invaluable reference work for any student and researcher of Korean History.

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Jimoondang. Kim, Hwansoo. (2014) ‘Seeking the Colonizer’s Favors for a Buddhist Vision: The Korean Buddhist Nationalist Paek Yongŏng’s (1864–1940) Imje Sŏn Movement and His Relationship with the Japanese Colonize Abe Mitsuie (1862–1936)’, Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies 14, no. 2 (April): 171–193. Kim, Kwangshik. (2000) ‘Buddhist Perspectives on Anti-religious Movements in the 1930s’, Review of Korean Studies 3, no. 1 (July): 55–75. Kim, Marie Seong-hak. (2012) Law and Custom in Korea:

economic expansion and creative innovation expanded rather rapidly only to be followed by a collapse (Goldstone 2002: 333–334), and in Korea’s case that collapse came in the nineteenth century. The ‘efflorescence’ of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was a case of Smithian growth or total economic growth in which the land market expanded because it was protected by legally recognised property rights that were strengthened after the Imjin Waeran of 1592–1598 to encourage farming.5

multitudes. ‘We never knew it was so awful. We had thought it a trifle, but, behold, here is what God thinks’” (Gale 1909: 209–210). To Koreans, it was sin that was causing their pain and suffering; it was the root of all of their problems and separated them from God. 70 Religion 1876–1910 Urging Koreans to declare their sins and ask for forgiveness publicly, missionaries made sin into a symbol that explained why Korean society was in a poor state and Koreans were suffering so much. At the

Wiwonhoe. Larsen, K. (2008) Tradition, Treaties, and Trade: Qing Imperialism and Chosŏn Korea, 1850–1910, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center. Lew, Y. I. (1977) ‘The Reform Efforts and Ideas of Pak Yŏng-hyo, 1894–1895’, Korean Studies, 1: 21–61. McNamara, D. L. (1996) Trade and Transformation in Korea, 1876–1945, Boulder, CO: Westview Press. Miller, O. (2007) The Merchants of the Myŏnjujŏn: Guild and Government in Late Chosŏn Korea, unpublished PhD thesis, University of London. –––– .

elite and ‘subaltern’ classes is managed through a complex negotiation in which relatively minor concessions are made to subaltern demands and sensibilities in exchange for a more general acquiescence to authority. Hegemony is a process by which the status quo is ‘normalised’ or ‘naturalised’, so that no other political or economic order seems remotely viable, even to those who remain disadvantaged by it. Colonial modernity’s foremost theorist, Tani E. Barlow, begins from the Marxist premise that

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