She Walks in Beauty: A Woman's Journey Through Poems

She Walks in Beauty: A Woman's Journey Through Poems

Caroline Kennedy

Language: English

Pages: 352

ISBN: 1455564079

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

She Walks in Beauty: A Woman's Journey Through Poems

Caroline Kennedy

Language: English

Pages: 352

ISBN: 1455564079

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In She Walks in Beauty, Caroline Kennedy has once again marshaled the gifts of our greatest poets to pay a very personal tribute to the human experience, this time to the complex and fascinating subject of womanhood. Inspired by her own reflections on more than fifty years of life as a young girl, a woman, a wife, and a mother, She Walks in Beauty draws on poetry's eloquent wisdom to ponder the many joys and challenges of being a woman. Kennedy has divided the collection into sections that signify to her the most notable milestones, passages, and universal experiences in a woman's life, and she begins each of these sections with an introduction in which she explores and celebrates the most important elements of life's journey.

The collection includes works by Elizabeth Bishop, Sharon Olds, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Mary Oliver, Pablo Neruda, W. H. Auden, Adrienne Rich, Sandra Cisneros, Anne Sexton, W. S. Merwin, Dorothy Parker, Queen Elizabeth I, Lucille Clifton, Naomi Shahib Nye, and W. B. Yeats. Whether it's falling in love, breaking up, friendship, marriage, motherhood, or growing old, She Walks in Beauty is a priceless resource for anyone, male or female, who wants a deeper understanding and appreciation of what it means to be a woman.

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Pencils and papers at the ready. At the Café PATRICIA KIRKPATRICK after Adelia Prado I must look like I’m confident, white cup for tea on the table before me, my son in his indigo bunting, asleep in the stroller. When I take out my pen I must look like a woman who knows what her work is while citron and currant bake in ovens behind me. Newspaper, lily— I read in the book that poetry is about the divine. God came to the window while I was in labor. Tenderness, tenderness! I have

Liberation are bywords when spoken by an appraiser, that the Accidental sometimes achieves perfection, loath though we may be to admit it: And that the realm of art is the realm in Which to look for “fishbones in the throat of the gang.” Pin- Pricks and the unstereotyped embarrassment being the contin- Ual diet of artists. And in spite of it all, poets ask us just what it Is in them that we cannot subscribe to: People overbear till told to stop: no matter through What sobering process

years and you never arrived splendid in your red dress without trouble for me somewhere, somehow. now it is done, and i feel just like the grandmothers who, after the hussy has gone, sit holding her photograph and sighing, wasn’t she beautiful? wasn’t she beautiful? lumpectomy eve LUCILLE CLIFTON all night i dream of lips that nursed and nursed and the lonely nipple lost in loss and the need to feed that turns at last on itself        that will kill its body for its hunger’s

wine, and sweethearts in the pomegranate flowers. If you do not come, these do not matter. If you do come, these do not matter. MAKING LOVE MY CHILDREN WERE HORRIFIED to see the words “Making Love” in the Contents for this book. After all, there are few things more disturbing than the idea of your parents being engaged in any sort of romantic activity. However, as I tried to point out, in literature the phrase “making love” refers to courtship, flirtation, and other aspects of romantic

Until the day break, and the shadows flee away, Turn, my beloved, and be thou like a roe Or a young hart upon the mountains of Bether. By night on my bed I sought him whom my soul loveth: I sought him, but I found him not. I will rise now, And go about the city in the streets, And in the broad ways I will seek him whom my soul loveth: I sought him, but I found him not. The watchmen that go about the city found me: To whom I said, “Saw ye him whom my soul loveth?” It was but a little

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