Shrink Rap: Three Psychiatrists Explain Their Work

Shrink Rap: Three Psychiatrists Explain Their Work

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 142140012X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Shrink Rap: Three Psychiatrists Explain Their Work

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 142140012X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Finally, a book that explains everything you ever wanted to know about psychiatry!

In Shrink Rap, three psychiatrists from different specialties provide frank answers to questions such as:

• What is psychotherapy, how does it work, and why don't all psychiatrists do it?• When are medications helpful?• What happens on a psychiatric unit?• Can Prozac make people suicidal?• Why do many doctors not like Xanax?• Why do we have an insanity defense?• Why do people confess to crimes they didn't commit?

Based on the authors’ hugely popular blog and podcast series, this book is for patients and everyone else who is curious about how psychiatrists work. Using compelling patient vignettes, Shrink Rap explains how psychiatrists think about and address the problems they encounter, from the mundane (how much to charge) to the controversial (involuntary hospitalization). The authors face the field’s shortcomings head-on, revealing what other doctors may not admit about practicing psychiatry.

Candid and humorous, Shrink Rap gives a closeup view of psychiatry, peering into technology, treatments, and the business of the field. If you've ever wondered how psychiatry really works, let the Shrink Rappers explain.

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Suggested Reading About the Authors Index Shrink Rap Introduction EVERY DAY, in many different settings, people seek out mental health services. Most do so voluntarily, but some who get care are required to—by the courts, by their employers, by their schools. Some patients come because they are desperate, others because they are curious. People want help with a wide range of problems. Some people have difficulties with their emotions, others have problems with their behaviors, some are

benefits are available only to people with diagnoses deemed to be “major mental illnesses.” Personality disorders can be terribly debilitating, but insurance will not usually pay for care if the patient’s only diagnosis is a personality disorder. Substance abuse as a primary diagnosis is also segregated, and the treatment of drug and alcohol addictions, in the absence of other mental disorders, is not done in primary mental health facilities. Although the Brandts all had difficulties that have

helpful for several reasons. A surgeon-in-training can watch a surgery. He can perform one with a more experienced surgeon in the room, and any given surgical procedure is finished within hours. Psychotherapy, however, is often regarded as private, and it is a process over time, sometimes years, so teaching it can be difficult. Supervision generally relies on the student’s accounts of what was said because supervisors do not typically observe the sessions. Being a psychotherapy patient is one of

considered; however, psychological testing alone does not predict or correlate with parental fitness. The purpose of psychological testing in custody evaluations is mainly to identify any gross pathology that may affect parenting ability. Once all this information is gathered and considered, the evaluator makes a recommendation about custody based on the legal standard of that particular jurisdiction. In the nineteenth century, courts followed the paternal preference standard, which

what purpose. Finally, people worry that medical information may be accessed by insurance companies, who might then deny patients either health or life insurance. Employers, camps, schools, and licensing boards already require people to divulge medical and psychiatric information. Might they require applicants to allow access to their EHRs? This seems unlikely, but it is not unreasonable for patients and physicians to worry about how their information will be used, and these issues are still

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