Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design

Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design

Stephen C. Meyer

Language: English

Pages: 624

ISBN: 0061472794

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design

Stephen C. Meyer

Language: English

Pages: 624

ISBN: 0061472794

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Signature in the Cell is a defining work in the discussion of life’s origins and the question of whether life is a product of unthinking matter or of an intelligent mind. For those who disagree with ID, the powerful case Meyer presents cannot be ignored in any honest debate. For those who may be sympathetic to ID, on the fence, or merely curious, this book is an engaging, eye-opening, and often eye-popping read” — American Spectator

Named one of the top books of 2009 by the Times Literary Supplement (London), this controversial and compelling book from Dr. Stephen C. Meyer presents a convincing new case for intelligent design (ID), based on revolutionary discoveries in science and DNA. Along the way, Meyer argues that Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution as expounded in The Origin of Species did not, in fact, refute ID. If you enjoyed Francis Collins’s The Language of God, you’ll find much to ponder—about evolution, DNA, and intelligent design—in Signature in the Cell.

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another. The obvious front-runner was Nobel laureate Linus Pauling. Next was an imposing team of Cambridge scientists headed by Lawrence Bragg and Max Perutz. The third was a team with the most sophisticated imaging equipment in the world, headed by Maurice Wilkins at King’s College, University of London. As for Watson and Crick, no scientist at the time would have even put them in the race. By most appearances, they were mere hangers-on at the Cavendish lab in Cambridge, a couple of young men

intelligence from which our own intelligence descends.”5 This foundational assumption gave rise to the idea that nature was “intelligible,” that it had been designed in accord with discernable laws that could be understood by those who subjected nature to careful scrutiny. Or as the astronomer Johannes Kepler said, scientists have the job of “thinking God’s thoughts after him.”6 Though Greek, Jewish, and Christian philosophers agreed about the rationality of nature, they did not necessarily agree

How improbable is too improbable? The answer is, “That depends.” It depends on the improbability of the event in question. But it also depends upon how many opportunities there are to generate the event. Here again my discussions with Dembski helped me think this through. He noted that there was another common fallacy in reasoning about chance and probability. He had already shown me that some people overlook the importance of pattern recognition in our reasoning about chance. He now explained

early theory proposing that these chemical building blocks collected in the earth’s early ocean, this hypothesized environment acquired the whimsical name “prebiotic soup.” Scientists typically imagined subunits of the DNA, RNA, and protein molecules floating freely in this soup or in some other favorable environment. The prebiotic soup would not only provide a rich source of the necessary chemical constituents for building proteins and nucleic acids, but it would also afford many opportunities

have hundreds of amino acids, and in many cases their function requires close association with other protein chains. For example, the typical RNA polymerase—the large molecular machine the cell uses to copy genetic information during transcription (discussed in Chapter 5)—has over 3,000 functionally specified amino acids.18 The probability of producing such a protein and many other necessary proteins by chance would be far smaller than the odds of producing a 150-amino-acid protein. Second, as

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