Sketching User Experiences: Getting the Design Right and the Right Design (Interactive Technologies)

Sketching User Experiences: Getting the Design Right and the Right Design (Interactive Technologies)

Bill Buxton

Language: English

Pages: 448

ISBN: 0123740371

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Sketching User Experiences: Getting the Design Right and the Right Design (Interactive Technologies)

Bill Buxton

Language: English

Pages: 448

ISBN: 0123740371

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Sketching User Experiences approaches design and design thinking as something distinct that needs to be better understood―by both designers and the people with whom they need to work― in order to achieve success with new products and systems. So while the focus is on design, the approach is holistic. Hence, the book speaks to designers, usability specialists, the HCI community, product managers, and business executives. There is an emphasis on balancing the back-end concern with usability and engineering excellence (getting the design right) with an up-front investment in sketching and ideation (getting the right design). Overall, the objective is to build the notion of informed design: molding emerging technology into a form that serves our society and reflects its values.

Grounded in both practice and scientific research, Bill Buxton’s engaging work aims to spark the imagination while encouraging the use of new techniques, breathing new life into user experience design.

  • Covers sketching and early prototyping design methods suitable for dynamic product capabilities: cell phones that communicate with each other and other embedded systems, "smart" appliances, and things you only imagine in your dreams
  • Thorough coverage of the design sketching method which helps easily build experience prototypes―without the effort of engineering prototypes which are difficult to abandon
  • Reaches out to a range of designers, including user interface designers, industrial designers, software engineers, usability engineers, product managers, and others
  • Full of case studies, examples, exercises, and projects, and access to video clips that demonstrate the principles and methods

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the market grows. With that growth comes expectations on the part of both customers and investors. What the investors want is for the growth to go on forever, and ideally, at ever higher rates. But generally speaking, no matter how good that initial product was, the company will not be able to sustain itself, much less sustain its growth, if it continues to sell that initial package unchanged. As an initial product, it was probably not perfect, and even if it was pretty good, others will eat into

result in something that could become a really central part of the larger ecology of your workplace. I just love working with things that embody the very essence of what I talk about and do. Design is all about “walking the walk,” and this is a great way to do it. And, by the way, just like IDEO spreads theTech Boxamong their studios, having a CoWall demonstrating the innovations of your company outside the executive boardroom or the corporate visitor’s centre is a pretty good way to both

are reading this, you are in some way involved in the design or production of interactive technologies. In light of this, consider the following: The worst thing that can happen with a new product is that it is a failure. The second worst thing that can happen is that it is a huge success. Table 1: Successful Products Breed Legacy Code The table lists a number of products and the year of their release. All of these products are still on the market. Where the name of the product or the

paper cut-outs, or some combination of these. I really like the paper cut-out and collage techniques that we see in cartoons such as South Park, or the animations of Monty Python troupe member Terry Gilliam (McCabe, 1999). They can teach us a lot about how to do effective, simple, and inexpensive animations that are consistent with the criteria that we have adopted to characterize sketching. They are also really useful for people like me who are drawing-challenged. Figure 110: Simple Animation

can be controlled, while the person doing the manipulation remains out of sight of the camera. Photos: Anab Jain and Louise Wictoria Klinker What they did is place a magnet in the bottom of each toy car. Then they drew the path that the car was to follow in the corresponding position on the bottom of the table. When they were shooting a scene, someone went under the table and moved another magnet along that path, and in so doing, dragged the car along with it, right in front of the video

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