Source: Music of the Avant-garde, 1966-1973

Source: Music of the Avant-garde, 1966-1973

Douglas Kahn

Language: English

Pages: 396

ISBN: 0520267451

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Source: Music of the Avant-garde, 1966-1973

Douglas Kahn

Language: English

Pages: 396

ISBN: 0520267451

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The journal Source: Music of the Avant-garde was and remains a seminal source for materials on the heyday of experimental music and arts. Conceived in 1966 and published to 1973, it included some of the most important composers and artists of the time: John Cage, Harry Partch, David Tudor, Morton Feldman, Robert Ashley, Pauline Oliveros, Dick Higgins, Nam June Paik, Steve Reich, and many others. A pathbreaking publication, Source documented crucial changes in performance practice and live electronics, computer music, notation and event scores, theater and installations, intermedia and technology, politics and the social roles of composers and performers, and innovations in the sound of music.

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delight in anything the avant garde does even though the attraction is often super­ficial. Of course, for the fortunate few the musical values of this new music are recognized and seriously considered, and, for them, the experience becomes a love feast. Rigorous examination of new concepts is essential to vital growth in the music of the avant garde. New music does, indeed, receive considerable attention from the press nowadays, yet it is all but worthless to the artist; for it is most often

AUSTIN: Of Europe. Of the Western world.  STOCKHAUSEN: It’s the same culture.  AUSTIN: The same?  STOCKHAUSEN: Certainly.  ASHLEY: Well . . . yes.  STOCKHAUSEN We speak the same language. We understand one another.  AUSTIN: The U.S. is a diverse culture. It’s a hard question for an American to answer.  ASHLEY: It is. issue no. 1   43 It’s very hard. You see . . . I don’t consider concert music to be in a very healthy state. So, when I say we have the same tradition as Europe, that doesn’t

should also do in order to reach a state of artistic grace. The composer’s dilemma seems inseparable from the medium itself. He dreams of a music that will transcend the instruments and still remain magnificently idiomatic. To achieve this dream, he naturally turns to the technical materials at hand. This is what Beethoven did with such great success in the last quartets. Boulez, in a latter-day vocabulary, repeats this performance, which has come to be considered the reality of music, the

θ.: Distributive; sensorium/two aspects/one object / multiplicative / directive / possibly taste smell feel (nonaural; nonvisual). ι.: Fan/machine/directive/objective/environmental. κ.: Opening/extensive/directional/encasement/extreme/Magellanic clouds. λ.: Contact/sensory/process/abrasive; fricative; application/ environmental/multiple. μ.: Spinal, gestural/observe/hold/interior/attack-stress. ν.: Total rotation/objective/suspension/total/inclusive/whole-number rotations only. North Shift

Department of Music at UC Davis for their letters of support; John Natsoulas for his encouragement through the early stages of this process; and Peter Blamey for his editorial assistance. This book would not have been possible without the generous assistance of Barry Klein and the UC Davis Office of Research, and Jessie Ann Owen and the Dean’s Office of the Division of Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Studies. Our greatest support has come from two very patient and hardworking individuals:

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