Space: A Journalist's Notebook

Space: A Journalist's Notebook

Language: English

Pages: 270

ISBN: 097176929X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Space: A Journalist's Notebook

Language: English

Pages: 270

ISBN: 097176929X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


"Space" is actually two books for the price of one. In the first half of this volume, in that part labeled "Space for Speculation," he takes a light-hearted but serious look into space, engaging in a challenging exploration of the nature of the infinite universe. The second half of this volume, "Flying Saucers: Fact or Fiction?" goes way back to the first extensive introduction of flying saucers to folks on Earth

Songs of the Doomed: More Notes on the Death of the American Dream (Gonzo Papers, Volume 3)

The Breaks of the Game

Beyond the Green Zone: Dispatches from an Unembedded Journalist in Occupied Iraq

The Silent Revolution: How Digitalization Transforms Knowledge, Work, Journalism and Politics without Making Too Much Noise

Videojournalism: Multimedia Storytelling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simon Driver, an Australian National University astronomer, who concluded that about 70 thousand million million million stars (7 x 1022) shine down on us each night. Happy 40th Birthday, N A S A The National Aeronautics and Space Administration began operations on Oct. 1, 1958, and this image was presented as the "Astronomy Picture of the Day" on Oct. 1, 1998. NASA's accomplishments are indeed astronomical, the Mercury and Gemini projects, the Apollo Project moon landings in the 1960s and

Dayton, Ohio, refused to treat their assignment lightly. In the previously mentioned Press Memorandum, released April 27, 1949, the investigators said, "While Project 'Saucer' evaluation teams report that no 'definite and conclusive evidence is yet available to either prove or disprove the existence of at least some of the remaining unidentified objects as real aircraft of unknown and unconventional configuration,' exhaustive investigations have turned up no alarming probabilities." They said,

undifferentiated. At least one pattern does stand out, and that pattern, up to a point, is that the saucers are seen most in the early part of summer and the early part of winter. The 139 significance of this pattern is hardly clear. To escape the possibility of burdening this report with a mass of inconsequential information, the New York Times has been taken as the representative source book for most of the flying saucer chronology for the period from June, 1947, to January, 1950. A

flight. (Project "Saucer's" report later said the mystery was cleared up when the object was identified positively as a cluster of cosmic ray balloons.) In the back seat of Combs' trainer was 2nd Lt. Kenwood W. Jackson, who confirmed that a light was seen and chased. (Sidney Shalett, author of a magazine article debunking the flying saucers, said he suspected the pilot might be mixed up by a combination of vertigo and a balloon. In making his investigation Shalett asked a pilot at Wright Field to

Farmington Times "were willing to believe there are such things as interplanetary space ships.") March 18,1950 — An American cameraman in Mexico City whofilmeda "shiny, fast-moving object" said the results would be delayed because his color film would have to be developed in the United States. Black and white shots by the cameraman were mined in the process of developing them, said Home Davis, Columbia Pictures publicist. March 18,1950 — Pilot Miguel Murciano, of the Cuban Aviation Co., said in

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