Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry

Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 0470575603

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 0470575603

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Untangle the complex web of philosophical dilemmas of Spidey and his world—in time for the release of The Amazing Spider-Man movie

Since Stan Lee and Marvel introduced Spider-Man in Amazing Fantasy #15 in 1962, everyone’s favorite webslinger has had a long career in comics, graphic novels, cartoons, movies, and even on Broadway. In this book some of history’s most powerful philosophers help us explore the enduring questions and issues surrounding this beloved superhero: Is Peter Parker to blame for the death of his uncle? Does great power really bring great responsibility? Can Spidey champion justice and be with Mary Jane at the same time? Finding your way through this web of inquiry, you’ll discover answers to these and many other thought-provoking questions.

  • Gives you a fresh perspective and insights on Peter Parker and Spider-Man’s story lines and ideas
  • Examines important philosophical issues and questions, such as: What is it to live a good life? Do our particular talents come with obligations? What role should friendship play in life? Is there any meaning to life?
  • Views Spider-Man through the lens of some of history’s most influential thinkers, from Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, and Immanuel Kant to Nietszche, William James, Ayn Rand, and Alasdair MacIntyre

 

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take this desertion lightly. “I trusted you, Peter! I took you under my wing! Is this how you repay me?”29 Ironically, he invokes Peter’s concern for his family: “Don’t be a fool! You really think you can just go back to your old life now that everyone knows who you are? This isn’t just about you anymore! What about May? What about Mary Jane?”30 To be fair, Tony does warn Peter of the consequences of being an outlaw, and the risks that it will expose his family to, but, as usual, Peter is not

of free creatures that God made—that perhaps, among other things, he made angels, who are invisible and extremely powerful. As free creatures, these beings would, like humans, have the ability to choose to be just or unjust. Typically, the Christian tradition has maintained that some such beings chose their own way over God’s and so became evil or “fallen.” Because angels were originally closer to God than men were, their punishment was greater than ours—as is consistent with “with great power

homosexuals and single women to have children to the creation of human-animal hybrids. On the other hand, there are arguments that human reproductive cloning isn’t simply permissible, but that it leads to serious moral goods. These goods include making it easier for infertile couples to have children, allowing couples to have children with the guarantee that they’ll not have a genetic disease carried by one of the parents, and libertarian appeals that it’s none of the government’s business what

got a nice monkey’s paw to sell you.10 Does this mean that characters can never change, grow, evolve, or adapt? Of course not, but these processes are gradual (we don’t expect Reed Richards to become the perfect husband overnight). Also, they usually start in a way that is consistent with someone’s character (Reed finally decides to dedicate a little bit of his big brain to understanding his wife’s feelings). Absent a life-altering event or a mind-blowing epiphany, we don’t expect fictional

atonement works, then the self-sacrifice of Christ accomplishes nothing except for some additional bookkeeping. All we do is end up deeper in debt! For consider: a debt collector at least is an honest fellow, someone who tells you straightforwardly what the terms are for your annulling your debt to him. When you’re in debt, you know where you stand and how you can work toward becoming self-standing once more. By contrast, when somebody professes to give you a completely free gift, no strings

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