Start Your Own Nonprofit Organization: Your Step-By-Step Guide to Success (StartUp Series)

Start Your Own Nonprofit Organization: Your Step-By-Step Guide to Success (StartUp Series)

Cheryl Kimball

Language: English

Pages: 170

ISBN: 159918527X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Start Your Own Nonprofit Organization: Your Step-By-Step Guide to Success (StartUp Series)

Cheryl Kimball

Language: English

Pages: 170

ISBN: 159918527X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Whether you want to serve a community need, assist citizens, or advocate for animals—your aspiration is a noble one and likely an ideal mission for a nonprofit organization. The experts at Entrepreneur show you how to turn your desire for change into a successful—and satisfying—business.

This indispensable guide helps you determine if your business idea is nonprofit or for-profit, understand and identify their business mission and vision, staff and run a lean operation, select and manage a board of directors, manage finances to the satisfaction of the IRS, find a location and set up shop, master fundraising, use social media and other cost-effective outreach, and manage sustainability and growth. All startup steps are supported by insider knowledge from successful entrepreneurs, dollar-stretching tips, missteps to avoid, resources, and more.

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and in support of the mission. Smart Tip Establishing a “culture of fundraising” within the board of a startup nonprofit right from the beginning is critical to the organization’s future. For these reasons alone it is important that the board pays close attention to finances and insists on complete transparency of the organization. Executives Four members of the board are elected as the officers of the board—president, vice president, treasurer, and secretary. In a mature

recognize the person with the highest number of volunteer hours over the past year or you might consider giving something to everyone who meets a certain amount of hours in a one-year period—what that number is will vary depending on your organization and the amount of volunteers you use. Appreciation Event Volunteers typically love being part of a community. Having an event where they can socialize with all staff and with each other is very meaningful. This does not have to be an

expensive or complicated event. Have it at your site if you have one; if not, find a simple place or one that people love to go to and hold it there. Be sure to pick a downtime for your organization so you are not adding this to a stressful time of the year when lots of other things are going on. Beware! If your organization works with youth or other “vulnerable” populations, it is a good idea to require background checks on volunteers. —“Legal Considerations When Engaging Volunteers,”

IRS publication 557 (see irs.gov/Forms-&-Pubs) before categorizing your nonprofit is not a bad thing to do. Beyond those general categories, the IRS further delineates nonprofits using such categories as “private foundations” (think of the ones you hear associated with NPR or PBS programming—the Getty Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, etc.) and “public charities,” including research groups and educational institutions. Bright Idea Write your mission statement

within the organization’s ability to keep up. If you are not prepared physically—office space, capacity of your soup kitchen, museum, or animal shelter—you could find yourself quickly overwhelmed and unable to provide the service you’ve been providing all along with any quality. Also, do you have the right person at the helm for significant growth? If not, can the person in place get the training that would make him or her the right person? Additional employees are often a necessity with

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