Street Food around the World: An Encyclopedia of Food and Culture

Street Food around the World: An Encyclopedia of Food and Culture

Language: English

Pages: 504

ISBN: 1598849549

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Street Food around the World: An Encyclopedia of Food and Culture

Language: English

Pages: 504

ISBN: 1598849549

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In this encyclopedia, two experienced world travelers and numerous contributors provide a fascinating worldwide survey of street foods and recipes to document the importance of casual cuisine to every culture, covering everything from dumplings to hot dogs and kebabs to tacos.

• Presents an international survey of street foods in representative countries and regions that includes interesting facts and recipe to illustrate many of them

• Supplies the historical and environmental background of the country's street food

• Includes sidebars with fun facts and statistics about street foods

• Provides highly useful information for students studying geography and for travelers

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are sometimes detectable only by a connoisseur of the food of the region. Street food is most prominent in those countries/regions where the traditions of the Ottoman Empire are most apparent: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia. Croatia and Slovenia were under Ottoman rule for a short period and then part of the AustrianăHungarian Empire, and this is reflected in their culinary traditions. Although the street-food culture of the Balkans is not as important

countries where street food plays a less important role, such as those in Northern Europe. Our reasoning was that travelers to these countries might also be in search of a street-food experience, which may be somewhat harder to find. Our contributors include some of the worldÊs leading food historians, academics, and journalists. While we are most grateful for their contributions, any responsibility for errors is our own. In addition to the contributors listed as authors, we would like to thank

bricks are ubiquitous in Bangladesh. The tea is mixed with sugar and warm milk and must be drunk piping hot. Some customers bring their own biscuits, fried snacks, or sweets purchased from other stands to munch with the tea. A round cookie called bela biscuit is sometimes dunked in the tea. Fruit and Vegetables Freshly cut fresh fruit, often sprinkled with salt and red chili powder, or kasundi, a liquid condiment made from mustard seeds, spices, and water, is sold everywhere, as are fresh

easy to eat a piece of fried chicken while walking through the market. Hong Kong and Macau | 161 Pretzel Preparations Many vendors offer „pretzel fish,‰ „pretzel pork chop,‰ and other items that may not actually contain any pretzels in the Western sense of the word. Rather, the word pretzel seems to refer to a light brown breading that contains neither pretzel nor salt. Vegetables Though not as flashy as grilled and skewered food items, many stalls that sell meat or fish also offer fried

Felafel (Israel) Fiadu (with Pineapple and Pineapple Syrup, Suriname) Fish and Chips (Great Britain) Fiskekaker (Fish Cakes, Norway) Focaccia (Bari, Italy) Fried Chicken Strips (African American) Frieten Met Mayonnaise (Belgium) Fujianese Oyster Omelette (Hao Zai Ping) Ful Meddames (Mashed Fava Beans, Egypt) Ginger Drink (West Africa) Green Papaya Salad (Thailand) Griddled Green Onion Flatbread (Cong You Ping, China) Gughni (Savory Chickpeas, Eastern India) Hainan Chicken (Singapore) Haleem

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