Sunset Oriental Cook Book (Chinese, Japanese, Korean)

Sunset Oriental Cook Book (Chinese, Japanese, Korean)

M. R. Piper

Language: English

Pages: 100

ISBN: 037602531X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Sunset Oriental Cook Book (Chinese, Japanese, Korean)

M. R. Piper

Language: English

Pages: 100

ISBN: 037602531X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Features more than 120 exotic dishes from nine Southeast Asian nations, as well as traditional favorites from China, Japan, and Korea, with tips on special ingredients, essential kitchen utensils and equipment, and step-by-step photographs to illustrate cooking techniques.

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ental markets in cans or bottles, from barrels, or in refrigerated plastic bags. Winter melon, doong gwah (C) or togan (J), I N G R E D I ENT SHOPPI N G 15 grooves. The Japanese make much use of a dri ed gou rd, kam pyo (J ), which looks like strips of raw­ hide in its cellophane-packaged form. Chinese sweet pickles, tzahp choy (C) , sold in cans, consist of mixed vegetables such as cucum­ ber, melon, carrot, and ginger. Cut in slivers, they make a pretty garnish for any sweet-and-sour dish.

water 1 pound boned, lean pork (butt or loin) 5 teaspoons soy sauce 3 tablespoons cornstarch 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil 3 to 4 Chinese pork sausages (descriptio n on page 1 2) Slice the pork across the grain into small bite­ sized pieces ;4 -inch thick. Stir soy sauce, cornstarch, and sesame oil until blended (mixture will be very stiff) , then stir in pork and mushrooms to mix well. Spread mix­ ture evenly in a rimmed, heatproof serving dish about 10 or 1 1 inches in diameter. Thinly slice

yol k 2 tablespoons water Cream lard with sugar until fluffy, then blend in almond extract and enough food coloring to tint mixture a light yellow. Thoroughly mix in the flour 1 cup at a time ; the last addition makes the mixture crumbly. To shape each cooky, measure 1 level table­ spoon of the dough and press with your hands to form a flat round cake about 1 � inches in diam­ eter. Place cookies on a greased baking sheet, slightly apart ( they do not spread ) . Gently press an almond in center

broth into sauce bowls which still contain a little sauce to make a soup. The traditional cooking pot is the vessel popu­ larly called a "hot pot," and known in Japan as a Mizutaki or Shabu Shabu pot. For instructions about different kinds of pots which can be used at the table, see Cook-at-the­ Table equipment, page 1 9 . For information about how t o present this dish as a party meal, see the Japanese Mizutaki Dinner menu on page 30. The dish is photographed on page 28. Boneless Meat

oil, soy sauce, garlic powder, vinegar, a sprinkling of pepper, crushed sesame seed, cayenne, and onion. Mix with your hands until well blended. Cover and chill in refrigerator for at least 4 hours. To cook, place meat strips on a rack over char­ coal and barbecue for 1 minute on each side. Meat should be brown but not crusty. Or, if you wish, heat a large frying pan, toss in meat, and cook over high heat for 2 minutes, stirring occa­ sionally. Provide bamboo skewers or toothpicks for spearing

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