Sustainable Homebrewing: An All-Organic Approach to Crafting Great Beer

Sustainable Homebrewing: An All-Organic Approach to Crafting Great Beer

Amelia Slayton Loftus

Language: English

Pages: 368

ISBN: 1612121233

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Sustainable Homebrewing: An All-Organic Approach to Crafting Great Beer

Amelia Slayton Loftus

Language: English

Pages: 368

ISBN: 1612121233

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Brew delicious organic beer at home. In this comprehensive guide, Amelia Slayton Loftus covers everything you need to know to brew at home with organic ingredients, stressing practices that minimize waste and use sustainable resources. Along with 30 irresistible recipes, Loftus provides expert tips on buying equipment, harnessing solar energy, recycling water, using spent grain, and growing your own organic barley, hops, and herbs. You’ll enjoy brewing homemade beer that not only tastes great, but is good for the environment. 

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crystal, caramel, and chocolate malts. These malts have had the grain starches converted to sugars right inside the grain kernel. They are heated to starch conversion temperatures while still wet from the germination phase of the malting process and before being dried in the kiln. Then the grains, which now contain fermentable sugars, are kilned at higher temperatures to create caramelization. The longer the caramelized grains are roasted, the darker and more complex are the flavors that develop.

signs of activity. If the yeast is very weak or very old, it can take as long as 24 hours. Gently shaking the starter every few hours or using a stir plate can accelerate the growth rate of the yeast. If you don’t see any activity after 24 hours, throw it out and get some fresh yeast. After the yeast activity is visible, it takes 10 to 20 hours for the yeast cell population to grow to its maximum density. The best time to use the yeast starter is when it is at peak activity. Accomplishing this

for lighter ones A pH range of 5.2 to 5.8 A mash thickness of 1.5 to 2 quarts of water for each pound of grain (3–4 liters per kg) Aerate, Aerate, Aerate! In the past dozen years or so, wort aeration has been given a lot more attention, as it rightly should be. Oxygen is a very important nutrient for the cellular reproduction of yeast. If there is not enough oxygen in the wort when the yeast is introduced, the yeast will still function, but in a diminished capacity, and the fermentation will

using, in a large mixing bowl. (If you prefer to keep the seeds, nuts, and coconut raw, you can reserve them and add them after the baking stage.) Add the hot liquid mixture a little at a time, and stir well after each addition so the wet grains moisten the other ingredients. Set the mixing bowl aside. You will need it if adding dried fruit at the end. 3. Spread the mixture evenly over two large, well-oiled or parchment-lined cookie or baking sheets. Bake at 350°F (177°C) for 20 to 30 minutes.

cotton sacks and running it in the clothes dryer with the low-heat setting. Before doing this, test the temperature of your dryer’s low setting; if the temperature exceeds 125°F (52°C), it could destroy too many enzymes and produce a substandard malt. If you are serious about producing your own malt and hops, a convection solar food dryer is a good investment. A well-designed solar food dryer has venting controls that allow you to adjust the airflow and thus the drying temperatures. Most solar

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