Tecumseh and Brock: The War of 1812

Tecumseh and Brock: The War of 1812

James Laxer

Language: English

Pages: 368

ISBN: 0887842615

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Tecumseh and Brock: The War of 1812

James Laxer

Language: English

Pages: 368

ISBN: 0887842615

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


At the turn of the nineteenth century, the British Empire is at the height of its ascendancy; Napoleonic France is struggling to maintain its position as a world power; and the incumbent American empire is quickly expanding its territory, while the Native peoples struggle to establish their own confederacy, their own independent nation.
Bestselling author, historian, political scientist, and scholar James Laxer offers a fresh and compelling view of this decisive war — which historians have long treated as a second American revolution — by bringing to life the Native struggle for nationhood and sovereignty; the battle between the British Empire and the United States over Upper and Lower Canada; and finally, at the heart of it, the unlikely friendship and political alliance of two towering figures of history: Tecumseh, the Shawnee chieftain and charismatic leader of the Native confederacy, and Major-General Sir Isaac Brock, protector and defender of the British Empire.
Highly engaging and impeccably researched, Tecumseh and Brock is a powerful work of history, an epic story of empires and emerging nations, of politics and power, and of two leaders whose legacy still lives on today.

Owning the Earth: The Transforming History of Land Ownership

Hun Sen's Cambodia

Blood Feud: The Hatfields and the McCoys: The Epic Story of Murder and Vengeance

Gray Zones: Ambiguity and Compromise in the Holocaust and its Aftermath (War and genocide)

The Renaissance: A Short History (Modern Library Chronicles)

The King of Vodka: The Story of Pyotr Smirnov and the Upheaval of an Empire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cockburn was already there, and he set out the following day in pursuit of Barney’s flotilla. Farther upstream, at Pig Point, Cockburn and his men came upon the sorry remains of the American naval unit. Sixteen of Barney’s seventeen craft had been blown up under his orders, leaving only one to be captured. Winder sent no troops forward to slow the British advance. He had managed to assemble a force of about two thousand soldiers, including three hundred regulars, at Bladensburg, a few miles

attractive, friendly, and warm-hearted young man who drew many friends and admirers. “He was fond of creating his jokes,” Stephen Ruddell wrote, “but his wit was never aimed to wound the feelings of his comrades.” Young women found him appealing. While there were many opportunities for Tecumseh to develop relationships with women during games and hunting parties that involved both sexes, he tended to shun advances. A favourite activity was called the “bringing dance.” The young men began the

far as New York City. In his book Union 1812: The Americans Who Fought the Second War of Independence, for instance, A. J. Langguth asserts that “commanding thirty thousand veteran troops in Montreal . . . Prevost took one third of his army over the border at the town of Champlain” and was “headed toward Albany.”11 On September 1, the British forces crossed the border, pushing down the west shore of Lake Champlain in the direction of Plattsburgh. They moved slowly along extremely poor roads.

militia. He informed General Prevost that he believed the Americans had about twelve hundred regulars and militia at Fort Niagara, and added, “I consider myself at this moment perfectly safe against any attempt they can make.”7 A few days later, Prevost replied to Brock in characteristic fashion, telling him, “I am convinced you have acted wisely in abstaining from offensive operations . . .” Still in a cautionary frame of mind, he wrote, “It is highly proper you should secure the services

lapsed. “In the interim,” he wrote, “the United States troops under your command will remain at their encampment near Buffalo.”15 To this Smyth replied a day later that “the badness of the weather and roads” had “harassed” the progress of his troops. They would now have to spend the next day washing themselves and their clothing, and 1,200 men should be prepared to march the day after that, on October 14. Van Rensselaer decided to proceed with his plans despite his problems coordinating

Download sample

Download