The 10 Best-Ever Depression Management Techniques: Understanding How Your Brain Makes You Depressed and What You Can Do to Change It

The 10 Best-Ever Depression Management Techniques: Understanding How Your Brain Makes You Depressed and What You Can Do to Change It

Margaret Wehrenberg

Language: English

Pages: 174

ISBN: 2:00195702

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The 10 Best-Ever Depression Management Techniques: Understanding How Your Brain Makes You Depressed and What You Can Do to Change It

Margaret Wehrenberg

Language: English

Pages: 174

ISBN: 2:00195702

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


A strategy-filled handbook to understand, manage, and conquer your depression, modeled after its best-selling counterpart on anxiety.
Why is depression one of the most pervasive of all mental health complaints? What makes the lethargy, mental rumination, loss of concentration, unassuageable negativity, and feelings of inadequacy so stubbornly resistant to treatment and so hard to shake off? What can you do to alleviate your symptoms and move in the direction of full recovery?

In order to answer these questions, Margaret Wehrenberg explains, you must first understand your brain. Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience research presented in a reader-friendly way, Wehrenberg skillfully describes what happens in the brain of a depression sufferer and what specific techniques can be used to alter brain activity and control its range of disabling symptoms. Containing practical, take-charge tips from a seasoned clinician, this book presents the ten most effective strategies for moving from lethargy into action, taking charge of your brain, and breaking free from depression to find hope and happiness.

It's My Life Now: Starting Over After an Abusive Relationship or Domestic Violence (2nd Edition)

Coming of Age on Zoloft: How Antidepressants Cheered Us Up, Let Us Down, and Changed Who We Are

Sybil: The true and extraordinary story of a woman possessed by sixteen separate personalities

Devil in the Details: Scenes from an Obsessive Girlhood

The Fine Arts of Relaxation, Concentration, and Meditation: Ancient Skills for Modern Minds (Revised Edition)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

especially in your behavior as you make attempts to resolve and cope with the stress: A compulsion to get work done Changes in your personal care (to get more time to work, you may neglect flossing your teeth, sleeping, and exercising, or you may skip dental appointments and physical checkups) Smoking, drinking, and overeating (which function as coping mechanisms that contribute to the deterioration of health) Decreasing social interactions as work increases (your entire social life becomes

idea that all the responsibility was his alone, Jonas was able to make changes in how he was dealing with this essentially unchangeable situation, and the cumulative effect of these changes shifted the balance of his burnout. His depression lifted, his health improved, and he was able to continue what would be a long period of providing care. Cooling down burnout is a process that takes time. Making behavior changes isn’t easy, but it will reduce your stress, diminish your exhaustion, and

major inconvenience? Is this a catastrophe? For each of these questions, write out the reasons why you think this is minor, major, or catastrophic. You are working on modulating intense feelings and calming them. Your brain will gradually change as you repeat this process over the course of several events, and over time you will develop a less overreactive stress response. You are learning in adulthood to do for yourself what your parents probably did not do enough of when you were a child:

negativity. You may judge yourself for drinking too much or continuing to smoke or not getting started on your college degree or having a messy house or being too much of a doormat to others. Now: Select a situation. Pick one in which you are struggling to do something differently—something you wish you could change or that makes you mad or frustrated with yourself. Or pick one in which someone else’s behavior is bothering you and you feel impatient with that person. Now, describe the

you feared? That the mistake you made at work didn’t result in your getting fired? That the wrong turn you took on the way to the party didn’t cause you to get there late and ruin the whole evening? I have many clients who got jobs after terrible interviews, passed tests they were sure they would fail, or had a good time at events they were dreading going to. Avoid Saying “But” The word “but” is your nemesis when it comes to broadening your perspective. Pay attention to how you use it to stop

Download sample

Download