The Architecture of Light: Recent Approaches to Designing with Natural Light

The Architecture of Light: Recent Approaches to Designing with Natural Light

Mary Ann Steane

Language: English

Pages: 256

ISBN: 0415394791

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Architecture of Light: Recent Approaches to Designing with Natural Light

Mary Ann Steane

Language: English

Pages: 256

ISBN: 0415394791

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Reviewing the use of natural light by architects in the era of electricity, this book aims to show that natural light not only remains a potential source of order in architecture, but that natural lighting strategies impose a usefully creative discipline on design.

Considering an approach to environmental context that sees light as a critical aspect of place, this book explores current attitudes to natural light by offering a series of in-depth studies of recent projects and the particular lighting issues they have addressed. It gives a more nuanced appraisal of these lighting strategies by setting them within their broader topographic, climatic and cultural contexts.

 

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of themes at the Fondazione Querini Stampalia. What will be argued here is that this choice of words is not arbitrary, but a way of characterizing his intentions which shows that Scarpa saw the project as an opportunity to make sense of Venice and its history through a rewriting of its light. 3.8 The situation of light at the north facade of the Fondazione that looks over the campo of Santa Maria Formosa. Entrance Light In Mazzariol’s opinion, the new entry bridge leads the visitor into a

critical. If such a building is to be predominantly daylit the potential access to natural light is obviously a critical issue. The long history of libraries as daylit spaces offers many useful lessons on daylighting principles, and can clarify the site conditions, relative size and value of book collection and readership, for which a particular daylighting strategy is suitable. As this history illustrates, side-lights, clerestory lights and roof-lights, alone or in combination, help to shape

marriage or some other fusion because of the manner in which science frames nature, and therefore us as well. It is customary now to refer to material or constructional interpretation as ‘technology’, invoking all the benefits and worries of the technological manipulation of life, etc. Historically, one usually looks to the appearance of this sort of awareness of a need for a fusion with the advent of perspective and of scientific method with Galileo. When Ackerman traces the motif back to Milan

traditional windows, as holes in the walls, which are there to look out of. They were generated by a completely different logic of openness. It is not the openness of an elevation that an architect could plan. Nor is it the openness of a system of geometric compositions. Instead, it is the openness of what remains of those glimpses across the terrain – glimpses, views, and glances that are sometimes very accidental, yet are the disciplined longitude-latitude lines belonging to a projection of

vertical form and the fact that its only sources of daylight are narrow roof-lights above the side walls, light levels are not high, and the light is very diffuse, very ‘flat’. One expects roof-lit atrium-type spaces to visually animate spatial sequences, and to open the rooms which surround them. This is anything but the case here. Views through a series of identical rectangular windows (in this case typical ‘holes in the wall, there to look out of’27) aligned vertically one above the other, are

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