The Art of Chess Combination (Dover Chess)

The Art of Chess Combination (Dover Chess)

Language: English

Pages: 240

ISBN: 0486205835

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Art of Chess Combination (Dover Chess)

Language: English

Pages: 240

ISBN: 0486205835

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


What, really, is a chess combination? It is a maneuver generally employing surprise and a sacrifice, in which pieces work together to bring about a sudden advantage. It is perhaps the most aesthetically satisfying and successful technique in the game. Some players believe that the combination is a spontaneous creation with no guiding laws; the possibility springs up in the mind like a flash of genius. In this classic work, however, Znosko-Borovsky proves that combinations can be studied. He demonstrates conclusively that they need not be a haphazard occurrence, but may be prepared for as an integral part of a player's game.
The great modern teacher begins by examining the games of master players, including Capablanca, Alekhine, Rubinstein, Nimzovich, Tarrasch, Reti, Mason, Morphy, Bird, Euwe, Emanuel Lasker, etc. The games are grouped according to common features, and perceptively analyzed to determine what conclusions may be drawn. Znosko-Borovsky shows that every combination, however complicated, begins in a simple idea, such as an undefended piece, the bad position of the hostile king, the promotion of a pawn, or a discovered check.
The Art of Chess Combination will improve the game of anyone who knows how to move individual pieces but finds it hard to plan many moves ahead to make the pieces work together. The exposition is easily understood; technical terms are almost completely avoided but clarity and precision remain.
"In the teaching of chess he may claim to have no superior." — Philip W. Sergeant.

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combination when one is lacking in imagination, still we claim that, as everything is visible on the chess-board, all that happens on it is subject to principles, which can be discovered, to the great profit of the most modest amateur. At any moment of the game the presence of an undefended piece may give rise to a combination. In the openings it is all a matter of traps. The classical example is Légal’s Mate, wherein Black’s undefended Bishop at KKt5 is the pivot of the combination. White’s KB

King-side Pawns are so often brilliantly attacked. On this side the heaviest sacrifices are frequently justified, whereas on the other strict economy of sacrifice is necessary. We will begin with combination against the KRP at R2(7). Three Attacking Pieces Usually the attack is conducted by three pieces, Bishop, Knight, and Queen. The Bishop occupies the diagonal QR1 -KB6, the Knight commands KKt5, and the Queen plants herself at KR5, or sometimes KKt4. This triple force is normally

INTRODUCTION TO DOVER EDITION THE reissue of Znosko-Borovsky’s classic requires no special pleading; it is a self-justifying event. Yet the readers who are coming to this delightful book for the first time may want to share with me some of the clashing ideas that were evoked by its original publication. Combination play, by common consent, is the most enjoyable and thrilling aspect of chess. It is very possibly also the most creative part of the game; to conceive combinations and execute them

flight-square to the King and preventing a defensive move by a piece; and, finally, the possibility of P - B7. In No. 163 the Queens have been exchanged, a fact which should, logically, weaken White’s attack. But in reality this does not count here, for the advanced Pawn, preventing the Black King’s escape, brings all defence to naught. No. 163 Hanover, 1926 D. Duhm We note that the combinational ideas here—the removal of Black’s KBP, which protects his KP, and the Knight’s manœuvre—are

mere refusal then leaves a material advantage with the other player. Nevertheless, in certain cases the combination is not really sound unless the sacrifice is accepted, and then it is by refusing that the game can be won. In the position in No. 196 White conceives a combination beginning with a pretty Bishop-sacrifice. If Black accepts it, then 2 Kt × P, followed by P - B4, with a crushing attack. But Black is not obliged to accept the sacrifice, and seizes the attack himself, utilising the

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