The Art of Making Magazines: On Being an Editor and Other Views from the Industry (Columbia Journalism Review Books)

The Art of Making Magazines: On Being an Editor and Other Views from the Industry (Columbia Journalism Review Books)

Language: English

Pages: 200

ISBN: 0231131372

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Art of Making Magazines: On Being an Editor and Other Views from the Industry (Columbia Journalism Review Books)

Language: English

Pages: 200

ISBN: 0231131372

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In this entertaining anthology, editors, writers, art directors, and publishers from such magazines as Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, The New Republic, Elle, and Harper's draw on their varied, colorful experiences to explore a range of issues concerning their profession. Combining anecdotes with expert analysis, these leading industry insiders speak on writing and editing articles, developing great talent, effectively incorporating art and design, and the critical relationship between advertising dollars and content. They emphasize the importance of fact checking and copyediting; share insight into managing the interests (and potential conflicts) of various departments; explain how to parlay an entry-level position into a masthead title; and weigh the increasing influence of business interests on editorial decisions. In addition to providing a rare, behind-the-scenes look at the making of successful and influential magazines, these contributors address the future of magazines in a digital environment and the ongoing importance of magazine journalism. Full of intimate reflections and surprising revelations, The Art of Making Magazines is both a how-to and a how-to-be guide for editors, journalists, students, and anyone hoping for a rare peek between the lines of their favorite magazines. The chapters are based on talks delivered as part of the George Delacorte Lecture Series at the Columbia School of Journalism.

Essays include: "Talking About Writing for Magazines (Which One Shouldn't Do)" by John Gregory Dunne; "Magazine Editing Then and Now" by Ruth Reichl; "How to Become the Editor in Chief of Your Favorite Women's Magazine" by Roberta Myers; "Editing a Thought-Leader Magazine" by Michael Kelly; "Fact-Checking at The New Yorker" by Peter Canby; "A Magazine Needs Copyeditors Because...." by Barbara Walraff; "How to Talk to the Art Director" by Chris Dixon; "Three Weddings and a Funeral" by Tina Brown; "The Simpler the Idea, the Better" by Peter W. Kaplan; "The Publisher's Role: Crusading Defender of the First Amendment or Advertising Salesman?" by John R. MacArthur; "Editing Books Versus Editing Magazines" by Robert Gottlieb; and "The Reader Is King" by Felix Dennis

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that magazine was really a woman who was 35-plus who had a lot of money. She was sophisticated. She was a consumer of the arts and she had $2,000 to spend on a handbag if she felt like it. Unfortunately, the magazine folded. But they didn’t blame me, I guess, because when they folded the magazine, they let me take over Elle. I’ve been at Elle for seven years. And what is Elle? It’s a core fashion book. Fashion is our promise, and our readers are passionate about it. The only metaphor I can give

you is that we cover it the same way that sportswriters cover sports. There are a lot of people, probably in this 56—roberta myers 50038_1P_02_nava13136_text.indd 56 2/24/12 6:33 PM room, who’d say “fashion journalism” is an oxymoron, but I’ll tell you, in the same way that a sportswriter will argue and argue that A-Rod made the second out in the third inning of the third game of the American League playoffs against the Tampa Bay Rays, not the third out in the second inning, fashion editors

Boston Globe combined. I think they have twenty people on the Hill on any given day. It covers agencies no one else covers and hearings no one else even goes near. It covers all of that, year in and year out, because that’s what the little group of people who pay a great deal of money for it actually wants. And they want it without any explicit worldview presented to them—they don’t even want much of an implicit worldview. For this kind of publication, the closer you can get to affectlessness, the

advertisers remained unconvinced and news of our demise was pretty much a weekly occurrence. In May 1985, I was in San Francisco speaking at an advertiser’s function when the call came to say the next issue would be the last. I flew back to lobby everybody in the company (and certainly the publisher, Doug Johnston), promising that we had a lot of good things in the works and had just hit our stride. To Si Newhouse’s credit, I must say, he gave us one more year, and we did find our stride, with

live, beating New York Magazine. Plus, we’ve stolen a little bit of the old Esquire ’s voice, New York ’s voraciousness, and the old New Yorker ’s sense that nobody needs to understand it but their readers, and they have no imperative but to be good. A moment ago I said I wouldn’t say what the Observer is about, but I will. It’s about the social and meritocratic power elite of New York, in politics, in real estate, and in media. It’s about climbing on the carcasses of the rich and powerful, as

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