The Associated Press Stylebook

The Associated Press Stylebook

Language: English

Pages: 378

ISBN: 0465004881

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Associated Press Stylebook

Language: English

Pages: 378

ISBN: 0465004881

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


More people write for the Associated Press than for any newspaper in the world, and writers have bought more copies of The AP Stylebook than of any other journalism reference. With this essential guide in hand, any writer can learn to communicate with the clarity and professionalism for which the Associated Press is famous. Fully revised and updated, this edition contains over 5,000 A to Z entries--including more than 50 new ones--laying out the AP's rules on grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, abbreviation, and word and numeral usage. Comprehensive and easy to use, The AP Stylebook provides the facts and references necessary to write accurately about the world today: correct names of countries and organizations, Internet language and search techniques, language to avoid, common trademarks, and the unique guidelines for business and sports reporting. The final word on media law, The AP Stylebook also includes an invaluable section dedicated to crucial advice on how writers can guard against libel and copyright infringement. The veritable "journalist's bible," this is the one reference that working writers cannot afford to be without.With more than 50 new entries plus updates of more than 100 others, The AP Stylebook includes such features as:An A to Z listing of guides to capitalization, abbreviation, spelling, numerals, and usage* Internet guidelines* Sports guidelines and style* Business guidelines and style* A guide to punctuation* Supreme Court decisions regarding libel law* Summary of First Amendment rules* The right of privacy* Copyright guidelines* Proofreaders' marks

Eighty Days: Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland's History-Making Race Around the World

The Killing Game: The Writings of an Intrepid Investigative Reporter

Only Love Can Break Your Heart

New Media, Old Media: A History and Theory Reader

Masters of Doom: How Two Guys Created an Empire and Transformed Pop Culture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

small city in West Virginia. chauffeur chauvinism, chauvinist The words mean unreasoning devotion to one’s race, sex, country, etc., with contempt for other races, sexes, countries, etc. The terms come from Nicolas Chauvin, a soldier of Napoleon I, who was famous for his devotion to the lost cause. check up (v.) checkup (n.) Chemical Mace A trademark, usually shortened to Mace, for a brand of tear gas that is packaged in an aerosol canister and temporarily stuns its victims. chess In stories,

half It is not necessary to use the preposition of: half the time is correct, but half of the time is not wrong. half- Follow Webster’s New World Dictionary. Hyphenate if not listed there. Some frequently used words without a hyphen: halfback halfhearted halftone halftrack Also: halftime, in keeping with widespread practice in sports copy. Some frequently used combinations that are two words with- 121-128_H.indd 111 out a hyphen: half brother half dollar half note half size half sole (n.)

doubt, consult Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft. NO QUOTES: Do not use quotation marks for aircraft with names: Air Force One, the Spirit of St. Louis. PLURALS: DC-10s, 747s. But: 747B’s. (As noted in plurals, the apostrophe is used in forming the plural of a single letter.) SEQUENCE: Use Arabic figures to establish the sequence of aircraft, spacecraft and missiles: Apollo 10. Do not use hyphens. aircraft terms Use engine, not motor, for the units that propel aircraft: a twin-engine plane (not

publishing or broadcasting the names of juvenile delinquents. Follow the local practice unless there is a compelling reason to the contrary. Consult with the National Desk if you believe such an exception is warranted. 141-145_J.indd 135 3/5/05 8:59:07 AM K K Use K in references to modem transmission speeds, in keeping with standard usage: a 56K modem (no space after numeral). The abbreviation should not be used to mean 1,000 or $1,000. Kansas Abbrev.: Kan. See state names. Kansas City Use

on whether to put commas around a word, phrase or clause used in apposition depends on whether it is essential to the meaning of the sentence (no commas) or not essential (use commas). See the essential phrases, nonessential phrases entry for examples. approve See the entry that reads adopt, approve, enact, pass. April See months. April Fools’ Day Aqua-Lung A trademark for an underwater breathing apparatus. See scuba. Arabic names In general, use an English spelling that approximates the way a

Download sample

Download