The Conversos and Moriscos in Late Medieval Spain and Beyond, Volume 1: Departures and Change (Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions, Volume 141/1: Converso and Morisco Studies, Volume 1)

The Conversos and Moriscos in Late Medieval Spain and Beyond, Volume 1: Departures and Change (Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions, Volume 141/1: Converso and Morisco Studies, Volume 1)

Language: English

Pages: 377

ISBN: 2:00284467

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Conversos and Moriscos in Late Medieval Spain and Beyond, Volume 1: Departures and Change (Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions, Volume 141/1: Converso and Morisco Studies, Volume 1)

Language: English

Pages: 377

ISBN: 2:00284467

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Conversos and Moriscos in Late Medieval Spain and Beyond adopts an interesting and original approach to the history of religious minorities on the Iberian Peninsula. The book is the result of two conferences held in 2005 and 2006 that were organised by its editor, Kevin Ingram, Assistant Professor of Modern History at Saint Louis University (Madrid Campus). In these contexts, leading scholars in Converso and Morisco studies from within the American and Spanish historiographical schools gathered in order to contribute to an improved exchange of knowledge and approaches between the two traditions. This effort is also notable because the conferences involved not only historians but also philologists and literary historians. Bearing in mind the wide gap that exists between historians and philologists with regard to their respective publications, conferences and theoretical perspectives, it is especially important to bring together experts on highly specialized topics such as the study of Moriscos and Conversos from across various disciplines.

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even bothered saying Catholic prayers, and spitefully commented that all the women who attended Mass were whores since they went only to see their lovers.57 The sisters and Juan Pardo advised another witness, almost certainly a Converso, that when the Host was being raised “it was a sin either to say or to perform a [Christian] prayer; rather, [one should] curse the Christians.” They also warned him of the penalty incurred by those—presumably of Jewish lineage—who 55 For the effect of the fall

537, c. 1, no. 5, 278v–279r. When witness no. 12 was discussing with Angelina and Aldonça other Conversas who had departed Valencia to return to Judaism in the Levant, the sisters explained to her “que anaven en aquelles parts per tornarse juhies, que anaven vestides d’or e de seda e quels eren feta molta d’onor e que aquelles se staven en lits de repos cuberts de seda e los marits de aquelles les servien.” Witness no. 2 heard most of the Cifuentes family describing similar scenes of splendor for

They ordered her bones to be disinterred and handed over to the secular arm of the Inquisition to be burnt. Trial of Isabel Rodríguez, no. 28, fol. 15r. 13 See the proceso of Isabel Rodríguez, no. 28, fols. 4r–5r. a thorn in the community 165 According to the accusations of the prosecution witnesses and the confessions of the accused themselves, many of the Conversos from Molina practiced Jewish rituals “with the intention of Judaizing.”14 They maintained the Sabbath customs—fasting, lighting

González, “[Diego López] has stated to everyone in this area and its residents that he has a thorn from the crown of our savior and redeemer Jesus Christ, and as such he asks all those who see it to revere and respect it, and persuaded by Diego López Cortés they do just that, and if it is true [that it is the holy thorn] he keeps it in a very disgraceful place and that he uses it with such indecency that it is found scandalous by those Christians who know about it; and if it is not [the holy

stating “that earthly pleasures and pursuits were better than the blessed eternity that the good and Catholic Christians are preparing for.”43 Another prosecution witness stated that some ten years previously he and a friend had needed bread and thus went to Diego López’s house to buy some from two young ladies (probably the daughters). The girls said that they had no bread and thus the two men went to an inn (posada) in search of some. Then López turned up and said from the street: “They are

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