The Distraction Addiction: Getting the Information You Need and the Communication You Want, Without Enraging Your Family, Annoying Your Colleagues, and Destroying Your Soul

The Distraction Addiction: Getting the Information You Need and the Communication You Want, Without Enraging Your Family, Annoying Your Colleagues, and Destroying Your Soul

Alex Soojung-Kim Pang

Language: English

Pages: 209

ISBN: 2:00195119

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Distraction Addiction: Getting the Information You Need and the Communication You Want, Without Enraging Your Family, Annoying Your Colleagues, and Destroying Your Soul

Alex Soojung-Kim Pang

Language: English

Pages: 209

ISBN: 2:00195119

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The question of our time: can we reclaim our lives in an age that feels busier and more distracting by the day?
We've all found ourselves checking email at the dinner table, holding our breath while waiting for Outlook to load, or sitting hunched in front of a screen for an hour longer than we intended.
Mobile devices and the web have invaded our lives, and this is a big idea book that addresses one of the biggest questions of our age: can we stay connected without diminishing our intelligence, attention spans, and ability to really live? Can we have it all?

Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, a renowned Stanford technology guru, says yes. THE DISTRACTION ADDICTION is packed with fascinating studies, compelling research, and crucial takeaways. Whether it's breathing while Facebook refreshes, or finding creative ways to take a few hours away from the digital crush, this book is about the ways to tune in without tuning out.

The Science of Navigation: From Dead Reckoning to GPS

Mastering Windows Server 2012 R2

The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age

Custom PC (September 2015)

Exploding the Phone: The Untold Story of the Teenagers and Outlaws who Hacked Ma Bell

Dance Notations and Robot Motion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2005, Abraham Heschel’s The Sabbath: Its Meaning for Modern Man was reprinted by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in a lovely new edition with an illuminating preface by his daughter Susannah. The Sabbath has been the subject of several other great works recently, most notably Judith Shulevitz’s The Sabbath World: Glimpses of a Different Order of Time (New York: Random House, 2010). Wayne Hope’s “Global Capitalism and the Critique of Real Time,” Time and Society 15, no. 2–3 (2006): 275–302, offers a

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