The Duel (The Art of the Novella)

The Duel (The Art of the Novella)

Heinrich von Kleist

Language: English

Pages: 72

ISBN: 1935554530

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Duel (The Art of the Novella)

Heinrich von Kleist

Language: English

Pages: 72

ISBN: 1935554530

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


About This Book

"No amount of wisdom could possibly make sense of the mysterious verdict which God intended through this duel."

A new translation of a key work by one of European literature’s most important early writers.

One of the few novellas written by the master German playwright, The Duel was considered by Thomas Mann and others to be one of the great works of German literature. The story of a virtuous woman slandered by a nobleman, it is a precise study of a subject that fascinated von Kleist: That people are sometimes seemingly punished for their very innocence.

This Is A Melville House “HybridBook”

HybridBooks are a union of print and electronic media: Purchasers of this print edition also receive Illuminations—additional curated material that expand the world of Kleist’s novella through text and illustrations—at no additional charge. 
 
To obtain the Illuminations for The Duel by Heinrich von Kleist, simply scan the QR code (or follow a url) found at the back of the print book, which leads to a page where you can download a file for your preferred electronic reading device.

"Illuminations" contains writings by Paul the Deacon - J.G. Millingen - Sir Walter Scott - Johann Ludwig Uhland - Miguel de Cervantes - Andrew Lang - John Carl Blankenagel - Louis and Regis Senac - Alfred Hutton - Fiore de Liberi and a collection of the twelve laws of chivalry.
 
Illustrations include: Gerhard von Kugelgen - Johannes Gehrts - Jörg Breu Jüngere and Pauls Hector Mair - Achilles Emperaire - George Muhlberg and others.
 
Also included is The Duelist’s Supplement – “The Art of Dueling: How To Shoot and Slash Your Way To Satisfaction” which includes an entire facsimile scan of Fior de Liberi's Flower of Battle.

Analog Science Fiction and Fact (January/February 2013)

Fantasy & Science Fiction (Extended Edition) (September/October 2012)

The Lesson of the Master

Lightspeed Magazine, Issue 30 (November 2012)

Lightspeed Magazine, Issue 30 (November 2012)

The Enchanted Wanderer (The Art of the Novella)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

his antagonist prepared to receive him. The countess having duly sworn both parties, the combatants rushed upon each other. The onset of Gontran was so fierce that his lance bent in the breast-plate of the youthful hero, who forthwith, no ways discouraged by the shock, ran his own through his antagonist’s body: the conqueror nimbly jumped off his horse, and most dexterously severed the slanderer’s head from his base body, and laid it at the feet of his sovereign. It is needless to add that the

Adelheide lifeless lay: And the King at the head of his daughter dear Sat wailing night and day. IV. ‘Beshrew me! now’ quoth Sir Degenwerth, ‘That ever I journey’d here: ‘Or gall’d my good steed with buckle and girth, ‘Or burden’d with shield and spear.’ V. Thereat young Adelbert boldly spake; ‘Twere shame to grudge and repine: ‘I hold a King’s Daughter a worthy stake ‘For life and all that’s mine.’ VI. ‘Nay, hie we home’ Sir Walter cried: —A stalwart Knight was he,

King cried for Lancelot, and trusted his honour and the Queen’s to him. Sir Lancelot spoke truly when he told Elaine that he had never worn the badge of lady or maiden, but for all that everyone looked on Sir Lancelot as the Queen’s Knight, who could do no worship to any other woman. The King likewise held Sir Lancelot bound to fight the Queen’s battles, and if he was absent on adventures of his own, messengers hastened to bring him back, as in the fight with Sir Mador. So things went on for many

children to whom they were left guardians, shall not be admitted, but punished. VIII. Whosoever keeps up an unreasonable feud with another, and will not refer the difference to law or to a fair battle, but invades his adversary’s land, burning and spoiling it, and carrying off his goods, especially if he has destroyed corn, which has caused a dearth or a famine,—if he appear at the tournament, let him be put to death. IX. Whosoever has been the author of any new gabel or imposition in any

boors in the neighborhood of the Cape of Good Hope, when following the plow, are frequently accompanied by numbers of small birds, that pick up the worms and grubs thus exposed to view, and so dexterous are these men with their long whips, that any of the little fluttering objects to which their attention is directed, will be struck by them with the greatest nicety possible. In doing this they never shut one eye. Neither does the carpenter when he drives a nail, or the blacksmith as he swings the

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