The Embroidered Armour

The Embroidered Armour

Roberto Peregalli

Language: English

Pages: 176

ISBN: 1906548331

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Embroidered Armour

Roberto Peregalli

Language: English

Pages: 176

ISBN: 1906548331

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Embroidered Armour examines the Greek Mysteries, mythology and legends that heralded a revolution in thinking between the time of Homer and Plato, which gave birth to the Western cultural tradition.

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The Mark of Athena (The Heroes of Olympus, Book 3)

The Folklore of Birds (Collins New Naturalist Library, Volume 39)

Secrets of the Wee Free Men and Discworld: The Myths and Legends of Terry Pratchett's Multiverse

National Geographic Essential Visual History of World Mythology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

these things are, it would be clear neither to the speaker himself nor to his listeners whether what he says is true or not, for there is nothing, as there would need to be, that we could refer to which would allow us attain clear knowledge (eidenai to saphes).” Hippocrates is defining the field of a science. The demarcation line cuts out ‘invisible things’ (ta aphanea). Among these, for example, he cites “the things above us” or “below the earth”. They are not part of science, in that they

(Phaedo 97b-c) “However, my friend, I felt myself falling from that lofty hope and carried further and further away from it, since as I proceeded with my reading I found that the man made no use of nous whatsoever, and assigned it no real principle of causality in to the order of the universe, but found causes in air and aether and water and all sorts of nonsense.” (Phaedo 98b-c). This would indeed “be a very careless way of talking. In fact it would mean being unable to distinguish that the

discriminating factor that allows the sage of Halicarnassus to refute the first and the second explanation and not the third lies, once again, in the word ‘invisible’. The former are refutable in that they posit as a cause for the floods of the Nile ‘visible’ phenomena: snow and the Etesian winds. The reason why they are in error lies in the link with the effect (in this case the flood of the Nile). The connection between two visible phenomena can thus be mistaken, but for precisely that reason

man, an onto-gnoseological position.6 The phrase of Protagoras, “man is the measure of all things” (B1), in spite of the critiques in the Theaetetus7, is fully realised.  The gods are abolished. In Platonic ascesis, forms themselves, things in themselves are enthroned. They are true reality, the only one to be contemplated. The rest is myth. “No external monsters exist,” Socrates says. “I have no time for them. What matters to me is the abyss that lies within man, to see if it emerges as a

becomes Gê (Earth). Chthonie, subterranean divinity, invisible depth, is transformed into Gê, surface, appearance. The link with the Mysteries becomes apparent. The subsequent veiling of Chthonie recalls that of the initiate. But this myth refers to something deeper. The culminating moment of the rite is the unveiling of Chthonie. The invisible depth opens up to Heaven. ‘Unveiling’ in Greek is also called aletheia, truth. In the unveiling of Chthonie it is truth that is at stake. But depth

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