The Encyclopedia of Hell

The Encyclopedia of Hell

Miriam Van Scott

Language: English

Pages: 341

ISBN: B004JC3EOE

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Encyclopedia of Hell

Miriam Van Scott

Language: English

Pages: 341

ISBN: B004JC3EOE

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Encyclopedia of Hell is a comprehensive survey of the underworld, drawing information from cultures around the globe and eras throughout history. Organized in a simple-to-use alphabetic format, entries cover representations of the dark realm of the dead in mythology, religion, works of art, opera, literature, theater, music, film, and television. Sources include African legends, Native American stories, Asian folktales, and other more obscure references, in addition to familiar infernal chronicles from Western lore. The result is a catalog of underworld data, with entries running the gamut from descriptions of grisly pits of torture to humorous cartoons lampooning the everlasting abyss. Its extensive cross-referencing also supplies links between various concepts and characters from the netherworld and provides further information on particular theories.

Peruse these pages and find out for yourself what history's greatest imaginations have envisioned awaiting the wicked on the other side of the grave.

A Beautiful Evil (Gods & Monsters, Book 2)

Tragic Views of the Human Condition: Cross-Cultural Comparisons between Views of Human Nature in Greek and Shakespearean Tragedy and the Mahabharata and Bhagavadgita

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

of conscience. All Johnson cares about is making a good impression as the new DJ on KAPH radio, but all the station’s records offer only disturbing funeral music. One, by the group the KARMAS, includes a booming voice inviting demons to partake of the “sacrifice,” which is in “the crucible from which there is no escape.” Terrified by the mysterious happenings, Johnson tries to flee but finds the door locked from the outside. When he tries to shut down the station’s electric power, the lascivious

Christ, in the form of a simple farmer. He also encounters personifications of virtues and vices (symbolizing good and evil people in medieval society) and talks with the angels Gabriel and Michael. Piers Plowman (Christ) offers to guide them all to the beautiful yet elusive Tower of Truth (heaven), if they first help him plant and cultivate his fields. But to the Plowman’s sorrow, most are unwilling to work for this goal and opt instead to serve their own shallow interests. In the narrative,

of eternal damnation. But after a near-fatal heart attack, Storm experienced clinical death and found himself cast into the underworld—a horrid, dark place of sheer terror. He repeatedly pleaded, “Jesus, save me!” and was soon revived by physicians. The memory of that terrifying realm haunted him constantly. Unable to cope with the images of that horror, Storm began studying Christianity. As his knowledge increased, he saw the need to make radical changes in his lifestyle. Storm completed his

adds to the suffering of those in hell, for they have nothing to look forward to except continued pain. After passing through the gate, the two immediately come upon a vestibule of wailing spirits. Virgil explains that these are people who would commit to neither good nor evil in life, deciding instead to serve their own self-interests. Since they did not choose evil, they do not deserve hell. But neither did they opt for goodness, so they do not merit heaven. Refusing to ally themselves with

the notion of ANNIHILATION, declaring that the suffering in hell is permanent and unrelenting. He describes the agonies of the damned down to the writhing of their fingertips, eyes, tongues, and bowels. The eighteenth-century preacher claims that souls in the underworld “shall be in extreme pain … every joint, every nerve” for all eternity. He adds that the suffering of hell is seen by the saved, making paradise more enjoyable. Today, hellfire sermons have become virtually obsolete. Modern

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