The Epic of the Kings: Shah-Nama, the national epic of Persia

The Epic of the Kings: Shah-Nama, the national epic of Persia

Ferdowsi

Language: English

Pages: 455

ISBN: 0710205384

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Epic of the Kings: Shah-Nama, the national epic of Persia

Ferdowsi

Language: English

Pages: 455

ISBN: 0710205384

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Translated by Reuben Levy

‘Among the many national poets of historical Persia, Ferdowsi is perhaps the greatest...In this superb translation of the epic, the Western reader would not fail to discern clear equivalents of chapters in Genesis, The Odyssey, Paradise Lost or the Canterbury Tales.’ Islamic Review
The Shah-nama is the national epic poem of Persia. Written in the tenth century it contains the country’s myths, legends and historic reminiscences. This edition makes available a valuable prose translation selecting the most representative parts of the original including the stories of Rustum, the giant hero and his son Sohrab.

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making of weapons of war, which he gave to valiant heroes eager for renown. By virtue of his kingly Farr he was able to mould iron into such equipment as helmets, chain-mail, and laminated armour as well as missile-proof vests, to swords and horse-armour, all of which he invented by h s perspicuous intellect. He spent fifty years at this task, part of the time being devoted to the accumulation of stores. For the next fifty years he gave his mind to the subject of apparel and such matters as the

ever stand in awe of the king.' With a cry he sprang up trembling, tore the proclamation into pieces, which he trampled underfoot. Out of the palace he went thundering into the street, his son ahead of him. [In the audience-hall] the nobles made sychophantic speeches to the king. 'Most famous king of the world,' they said, 'even the cool winds of heaven do not venture to pass over your head on the day of battle. How then dare this crude-spoken KPva address you in anger as though he were your

escapes from BahrZnz KharrZd explains the Hindu religion Kharrzd rebukes the Christians for strqing from Christ (v) The Caesar sends his datghter to Khosrow (vi) Khosrow does battle with Bahrgm (vii) BahrZm fees for refuge to the KhZqZn of China (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) XXXV FERDOWSI'S L A M E N T F O R T H E D E A T H O F HIS S O N XXXVI R A H R A M CHUBINA I N CHINA 366 367 (i) Bahrim and the KhZqZn of China (ii) KharrZd sends Qalun to BahrZm, who is slain XXXVII T H E S T O R Y OF G O R D I Y A

dome be the ground you tread! You have come a far distance on foot from your palace; your royal limbs are fatigued.' As the gallant prince heard the voice from the tower, he gazed upwards and saw the sunny-cheeked maiden. At once the roof-top became a shining jewel to him; the very earth turned to ruby and jacinth from the lustre of her visage. He answered her, 'You who are as beautiful as the moon, accept my salutation and Heaven's blessing. Ho-w many nights, my gaze turned upwards, have I

seized the other by the girdle at his waist. If Tahamtan were to grasp at a rock he could snatch away pieces from black basalt on a day of battle, and he now endeavoured by seizing SohrZb's belt to wrest him from the saddle. But the youth's middle evaded any touch and he contrived by his suppleness to leave the hand of Rostam empty. Once more SohrZb raised his heavy club from the saddle, contracted his thighs and dealt a crippling blow at his opponent's shoulder. He writhed with the pain but

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