The Ethics of Private Practice: A Practical Guide for Mental Health Clinicians

The Ethics of Private Practice: A Practical Guide for Mental Health Clinicians

Jeffrey E. Barnett, Jeffrey Zimmerman, Steven Walfish

Language: English

Pages: 216

ISBN: 0199976627

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Ethics of Private Practice: A Practical Guide for Mental Health Clinicians

Jeffrey E. Barnett, Jeffrey Zimmerman, Steven Walfish

Language: English

Pages: 216

ISBN: 0199976627

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Ethics of Private Practice helps mental health professionals understand the essential ethical issues related to the many challenges of being in independent practice. Seasoned clinicians Barnett, Zimmerman, and Walfish offer readers astute insight into building a practice that is designed to minimize unintended ethics violations and reduce associated risks. Each chapter focuses on a major aspect of the business of practice and incorporates relevant standards from the ethics codes of four mental health professions. Topics addressed include planning and successfully managing a practice, documentation and record keeping, dealing with third parties and protecting confidentiality, managing practice finances, staff training and office policies, advertising and marketing a practice, continuing professional development activities, and the closing of a private practice. Full of practical tips that can be readily implemented, this handy guide will be the go-to resource for all mental health clinicians in private practice.

Rebuilding Shattered Lives: Treating Complex PTSD and Dissociative Disorders

Forensic Mental Health Assessment: A Casebook (2nd Edition)

Understanding Suicide: A Sociological Autopsy

The Sober Truth: Debunking the Bad Science Behind 12-Step Programs and the Rehab Industry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“counselor–client nonprofessional relationships with clients, former clients, their romantic partners, or their family members should be avoided, except when the interaction is potentially beneficial to the client” (p. 5). In such cases, counselors are required to engage in these multiple relationships only with the client’s informed consent after the potential risks and benefits as well as options and alternatives are considered, along with the rationale for entering into the multiple

the like. Being able to refer back to previous treatment-session notes can prove invaluable for refreshing your memory and not forgetting or overlooking relevant treatment information. Those with busy practices and many clients will find this to be especially important. Assisting You If a Client Returns to Treatment at a Later Date Many clients leave treatment for a period of time and then return. Clients typically leave treatment when their goals have been achieved. However, if they have found

whether the prospect of your testimony will compromise any treatment being considered as a result of the release of the client’s confidential information, and the pressing need the client has for you to provide favorable testimony. It is important to be absolutely clear about whether you are functioning in an evaluative role for the court or in a treatment role. At the outset of your professional relationship, clearly establish the limits of confidentiality and the risks associated with your

8 Continuing Professional Development In the mid-to-late 1970s, when sending graduate students off to clinical practice, professors often gave the advice, “Keep up with your reading.” Ordering a few journals and joining a professional book club, as well as going to a professional conference every now and then, was what it took to keep up. Now the amount of information is daunting. The number of journals, books, conferences, and ways information is presented is ever increasing. With the

practitioner, it is important that you arrange your professional life so that although you may be practicing alone, you do not practice in isolation. Handelsman (2001) suggests that without input from other mental health professionals, a clinician is at risk of becoming too insulated, too narrow in their thinking, and hence at increased risk for unethical conduct. So, if you do practice alone, we think it important to ensure that you will have input from other clinicians. Ways to obtain this

Download sample

Download