The Everyday Atlantic: Time, Knowledge, and Subjectivity in the Twentieth-Century Iberian and Latin American Newspaper Chronicle (SUNY series in Latin American and Iberian Thought and Culture)

The Everyday Atlantic: Time, Knowledge, and Subjectivity in the Twentieth-Century Iberian and Latin American Newspaper Chronicle (SUNY series in Latin American and Iberian Thought and Culture)

Tania Gentic

Language: English

Pages: 325

ISBN: 2:00317168

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Everyday Atlantic: Time, Knowledge, and Subjectivity in the Twentieth-Century Iberian and Latin American Newspaper Chronicle (SUNY series in Latin American and Iberian Thought and Culture)

Tania Gentic

Language: English

Pages: 325

ISBN: 2:00317168

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Rethinks the concepts of nation, imperialism, and globalization by examining the everyday writing of the newspaper chronicle and blog in Spain and Latin America.

In The Everyday Atlantic, Tania Gentic offers a new understanding of the ways in which individuals and communities perceive themselves in the twentieth-century Atlantic world. She grounds her study in first-time comparative readings of daily newspaper texts, written in Spanish, Portuguese, and Catalan. Known as chronicles, these everyday literary writings are a precursor to the blog and reveal the ephemerality of identity as it is represented and received daily. Throughout the text Gentic offers fresh readings of well-known and lesser-known chroniclers (cronistas), including Eugeni d’Ors (Catalonia), Germán Arciniegas (Colombia), Clarice Lispector (Brazil), Carlos Monsiváis (Mexico), and Brazilian blogger Ricardo Noblat.

>While previous approaches to the Atlantic have focused on geographical crossings by subjects, Gentic highlights the everyday moments of reading and thought in which discourses of nation, postcolonialism, and globalization come into conflict. Critics have often evaluated in isolation how ideology, ethics, affect, and the body inform identity; however, Gentic skillfully combines these approaches to demonstrate how the chronicle exposes everyday representations of self and community.

Tania Gentic is Assistant Professor of Spanish at Georgetown University.

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of Hispanism has preoccupied numerous scholars who presume that the uniting force for studying Spain and Latin America together would be the two continents’ shared language (Resina, Del hispanismo 29). This supposition, however, is highly problematic if one wishes to address the multiple indigenous languages in Latin America, not to mention Catalan, Galician, Basque, and Portuguese. Using Spanish as the basis for comparison by default 24 THE EVERYDAY ATLANTIC relegates these other languages

individual subject into the multiple, coexisting and ever-changing communal imaginaries and the multiple intersubjective relationships such social structures imply. Reading Time, Knowledge, and Power in the Ibero-American Atlantic 37 Epistemologies, as well as practices, of power, then, are included in the meanwhile reading that the chronicle and the blog create daily when they circulate knowledge in new contexts and rewrite the overlapping borders of community in new ways. From a critical

age advances, it will be important to consider even more carefully the haptic and other material experiences of meanwhile reading. In light of this, the newspaper “meanwhile” requires thinking about palimpsestic subjectivity in terms of knowledges concerning the body, aff ect, and aesthetics, as well as the intersubjectivity implied by the epistemological relationships discourse creates between the subject and the multiple imagined communities and daily reading publics with which she is

(post)colonial selves and others. To date, the main alternative to binary modes of thought seems to have been the now-tired liminal or third space that is always-already defined by the established poles of Western colonizing epistemology (self and other, center and periphery, metropolis and colony, become the in-between, ambiguity, and ambivalence). Palimpsestic or meanwhile, rather than third-space, understandings of everyday subjectivity, though, overturn the implicitly binary structures of

reform the educational system in Colombia. Often surrounded by advertisements for Quaker Oats and other growing multinational companies, these chronicles, many of which were later collected in Memorias de un congresista (1933) and Diario de un peatón (1938), usually appeared on page 4 of the first section of El Tiempo, sharing space with the daily editorial written by the editor of the paper.5 Politically, Colombia was in transition. The Conservative government had just transferred power for the

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