The Films in My Life

The Films in My Life

Language: English

Pages: 358

ISBN: 0306805995

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Films in My Life

Language: English

Pages: 358

ISBN: 0306805995

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


François Truffaut (1932-1984), perhaps the most respected member of the New Wave group of French moviemakers, left a legacy of beloved and influential films that include The 400 Blows, Jules and Jim, Stolen Kisses, Day for Night, and The Story of Adele H. Equally fascinating is the very large body of film criticism Truffaut wrote over many years for Cahiers du Cinema and other leading film journals. Wonderfully varied, personal, and informal, these reviews all communicate unabashed love for and an enormous excitement about the movies. The Films in My Life is Truffaut’s own selection of more than one hundred essays that range widely over the history of film and pay tribute to Truffaut’s particular heroes, among them Hitchcock, Welles, Chaplin, Renoir, Cocteau, Bergman, and Buñuel.

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Inside the king’s house, Ruppert undresses to take a bath and Shadow goes out to buy him some clothes—another image from the New Testament, the possessed man who was cured. “This man was without clothes at that time to symbolize the fact that we had lost our original faith and justice, which had been like a vestment of light that had covered us in our state of innocence.” Shortly, McCarthy’s man comes to take the boy away and lead him to Herod, “this hypocrite prince, who concealed the design he

Alfred Hitchcock (before 1940) and in the young Swede, Ingmar Bergman, in his period of conjugal comedies before 1955. Capra is the last survivor of that great quartet of American comedy; Leo McCarey, Ernst Lubitsch, and Preston Sturges. An Italian, born in Palermo, he brought to Hollywood the secrets of the commedia dell’arte. He was a navigator who knew how to steer his characters into the deepest dimensions of desperate human situations (I have often wept during the tragic moments of Capra’s

“Would this ideal film be closer to I Confess or to The Lady Vanishes?” “Oh, to I Confess!” “I Confess?” “Yes, by all means. For example, right now I’m thinking over an idea for a film that attracts me very much. Two years ago, a musician from the Stork Club in New York, returning home after work at about two in the morning, was accosted by two men at his door who dragged him to a number of different places, including several bars. In each place they asked, ‘Is this the man? Is this the man?’

tried to get him to admit—he was always complaining—that he had had a fine career, varied and full, and that all things considered he had achieved great success and ought to be contented. “Sure, I would feel happy…if there hadn’t been any reviews.” This remark, undeniably sincere, stupefied me. I told Duvivier that when I had been a critic and had insulted Yves Allegret, Jean Delannoy, André Cayatte, even Duvivier himself, I was always aware, deep down, that I was like a cop directing traffic on

since 1954 for various newspapers and magazines. In the period between 1954 and 1958, there are, first, articles I wrote as a journalist and then articles I wrote as a director. The distinction is important. Once I became a director, I did not criticize my colleagues’ work but only wrote about it as desire and opportunity dictated. This book contains about a sixth of what I have written. The choice can be criticized, but it is my own. I have included very few bad reviews, even though I had the

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