The First Mystery Megapack: 25 Modern and Classic Tales by Masters (Mystery Megapack, Book 1)

The First Mystery Megapack: 25 Modern and Classic Tales by Masters (Mystery Megapack, Book 1)

Language: English

Pages: 295

ISBN: 2:00343873

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The First Mystery Megapack: 25 Modern and Classic Tales by Masters (Mystery Megapack, Book 1)

Language: English

Pages: 295

ISBN: 2:00343873

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Hours of great reading await, with mystery and crime tales from some of the 20th century's most renowned authors.

About the Megapacks
Over the last few years, our “Megapack” series of ebook anthologies has proved to be one of our most popular endeavors. (Maybe it helps that we sometimes offer them as premiums to our mailing list!) One question we keep getting asked is, “Who’s the editor?”
The Megapacks (except where specifically credited) are a group effort. Everyone at Wildside works on them. This includes John Betancourt, Mary Wickizer Burgess, Sam Cooper, Carla Coupe, Steve Coupe, Bonner Menking, Colin Azariah-Kribbs, Robert Reginald. A. E. Warren, and many of Wildside’s authors… who often suggest stories to include (and not just their own!)

Contents:
• “A Senior Discount on Death” is copyright © 2006 by Noreen Wald. It originally appeared in Chesapeake Crimes II
• “Murder on the Orient Express” is copyright © 1995 by Art Taylor. It was originally published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, December 1995
• “The Stolen Venus,” is copyright © 2008 by Darrell Schweitzer. It was originally appeared in Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, October 2008
• “Rear View Murder” is copyright © 2006 by Carla Coupe. It originally appeared in Chesapeake Crimes II
• “Thubway Tham’s Inthult,” by Johnston McCulley, originally appeared in Detective Story Magazine, October 21, 1919
• “The Ides of March,” by E.W. Hornung, originally appeared in The Amateur Cracksman (1905)
• “Pinprick” is copyright © 2009 by Skadi Beorg. It was originally published in the short story collection Always After Thieves Watch
• “The Red Herring,” by William Hope Hodgson, originally appeared in Captain Gault (1917)
• “Dragon Bones” is copyright © 2003 by Jacqueline Seewald. It was originally published by Orchard Press Mysteries in September 2003
• “The Golden Slipper,” by Anna Katherine Green, originally appeared in The Golden Slipper and Other Problems for Violet Strange (1915)
• “Kali,” by Eric Taylor, originally appeared in All-Star Detective, November 1929
• “Driven to Distraction” is copyright © 2006 by Marcia Talley. It originally appeared in Chesapeake Crimes II
• “The Blue Cross,” by G.K. Chesterton, originally appeared in The Innocence of Father Brown (1911)
• “The Worst Noel” is copyright © 2009 by Barb Goffman. It originally appeared in The Gift of Murder
• “Mr. Clackworthy’s Pot of Gold,” by Christopher B. Booth, originally appeared in Detective Story Magazine (1920)
• “The Monkey God,” by Seabury Quinn, originally appeared in Real Detective Tales, April-May, 1927
• “Wedding Knife” is copyright © 2004 by Elaine Viets. It was originally published in Chesapeake Crimes
• “The Mad Detective,” by John D. Swain, originally appeared in Detective Story Magazine, May 8, 1926
• “The Adventure of the Diamond Necklace,” by G.F. Forrest, originally appeared in Misfits: A Book of Parodies (1905)
• “Security Blanket” is copyright © 2004 by Toni L.P. Kelner. It was was originally published in Riptide: Crime Stories by New England Writers
• “A Crook Without Honor,” by Johnston McCulley, originally appeared in Detective Story Magazine (1921)
• “The Daughter of Huang Chow,” by Sax Rohmer originally appeared in Tales of Chinatown (1922)
• “Anchors Away,” is copyright © 2010 by C. Ellett Logan. It originally appeared in Chesapeake Crimes: They Had It Comin’
• “Ways of Darkness,” by E.S. Pladwell, originally appeared in All-Story Weekly, October 25, 1919
• “Thubway Tham’s Inthane Moment,” by Johnston McCulley, originally appeared in Detective Story Magazine, Nov. 19. 1918

Out of the Light, Into the Shadows

WikiWorld

Passages: 24 Modern Indian Stories

The Penguin Book of Spanish Verse (Penguin Poets) (Penguin Classics)

Russian Science Fiction: An Anthology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

prevent us from sailing up the local river (Sangarius), and so we proceed over rough roads by carriage. The heat oppresses us. My assistant, Servilius Pudens, became ill for a time, but my Greek physician, Arpocras, yet again proved himself invaluable.… * * * * 2. Trajan to Pliny Your own well-being, my dear Pliny, and that of your party remain foremost in my thoughts. I am glad that the invaluable Arpocras has cured Pudens of his illness. You are wise to adapt your travel to local conditions.

could not imagine, but she prayed that it might be in some more sunny clime. She found herself to be thinking over much of John Hampden. His bona fides were not above suspicion, but she could scarcely expect to meet a really white man in such an environment. Lala would have liked to think that he was white, but could not force herself to do so. She would have liked to think that he sought her company because she appealed to him personally; but she had detected the fact that another motive

unnoted, and curiosity was rife among certain onlookers as to which of the twin belles was responsible for this change in his well-known habits. Unfortunately, no opportunity was given him for showing. Other and younger men had followed his lead into the box, and they saw him forced upon the good graces of the fascinating but inconsequent Miss Strange whose rapid fire of talk he was hardly of a temperament to appreciate. Did he appear dissatisfied? Yes; but only one person in the opera house

of value was found missing from the dressing-room or from the tables where wedding gifts were displayed. Nothing was safe where they went, and though, in the course of time, each article found its way back to its owner in a manner as mysterious as its previous abstraction, the scandal grew and, whether with good reason or bad, finally settled about the person of Miss Driscoll, who was the showiest, least pecuniarily tempted, and most dignified in manner and speech of them all. Some instances had

one who possesses the beauty of the moonflower and the wisdom of the serpent? It is even as you have said.” Rosalie preened herself like a satisfied bird. “You do well to call me moonflower, who was known by that name for many years,” she announced. “Uncle Harvey,” she resumed her rather shaky English as she addressed the Professor, though she was perfectly aware he spoke Hindustani as well as she did, “I think they will make no mistake when they hang this fellow. He is one dam’ bad egg.”

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