The Food of Malaysia: 62 Easy-to-follow and Delicious Recipes from the Crossroads of Asia (Authentic Recipes Series)

The Food of Malaysia: 62 Easy-to-follow and Delicious Recipes from the Crossroads of Asia (Authentic Recipes Series)

Language: English

Pages: 112

ISBN: 0794606091

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Food of Malaysia: 62 Easy-to-follow and Delicious Recipes from the Crossroads of Asia (Authentic Recipes Series)

Language: English

Pages: 112

ISBN: 0794606091

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Create flavorful and visually stunning dishes with this easy-to-follow Malaysian cookbook.

The Food of Malaysia presents over 62 easy-to-follow recipes with detailed descriptions of Malaysian cooking methods and ingredients, enabling you to reproduce the exotic flavors of Malaysia in your own kitchen.

Malaysia's cuisine is an exciting blend of Malay, Chinese, Indian, and European cooking. Drawing on their multiethnic heritage, Malaysians have developed unique variations on Asian favorites like Malay Chicken Satay, Chinese Fried Kway Teow and Indian Chicken Curry Puffs. Added to these are exotic creations like the fiery Portuguese Baked Fish prepared by Malacca's Eurasian community, Kelantanese Nasi Ulam (rice blended with handfuls of freshly chopped herbs) and savory Butter Prawns—a dish that blends seasonings from all of Malaysia's major ethnic groups.

The Food of Malaysia provides a selection of unforgettable recipes, at the same time introducing the reader to the nation's diverse cultural and culinary traditions.

Delicious Malaysian recipes include:

  • Mango Chutney
  • Borneo Fish Ceviche
  • Zen's Crispy Brown Noodles with Gravy
  • Fiery Chicken Curry Devil
  • Southern Indian Mutton Curry
  • Black Pepper Crab
  • Pancakes with Sweet Coconut Filling
  • And many more…

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6 dried black Chinese mushrooms, soaked, boiled and thinly sliced Pepper to taste (optional) Green chilli, sliced, to serve Soy sauce, to serve Chilli Ginger Sauce (page 33) Basic Stock 300 g (10 oz) chicken bones or chicken meat 3 dried scallops � cup (90 g) very small dried ikan bilis (baby anchovies or whitebait) 5 stalks celery ribs, cut into lengths 3 cloves garlic, peeled and bruised 1 medium carrot, cut into chunks 1 cm (½ in) ginger, peeled and bruised � teaspoon white

for another minute. Add the crispy silverfish or salted fish and stir to mix well. Serve immediately. Note: Leftover rice kept overnight is preferred for any fried rice dish, as it is drier and firmer, and will result in a better textured fried rice dish. Serves 4 Preparation time: 15 mins Cooking time: 10 mins Barbecued Chicken Wings 1 kg (2 lbs) chicken wings 2 tablespoons oyster sauce 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons rice wine or sherry 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon black soy

spread with a "brush" of fragrant lemongrass, is irresistible. It's no wonder this Malay dish is an all-time favourite. � teaspoon chilli powder 2 tablespoons sugar � teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon turmeric powder 4 chicken legs and thighs, deboned and cut into 2-cm (¾-in) cubes 12 skewers soaked in water for 1 hour 1 stalk lemongrass, thick end lightly bruised, for brushing Oil for brushing Satay Sauce (see recipe below), for dipping Cucumber, sliced, to serve Onion, sliced, to serve

country. The Chinese brought with them the cooking styles of their homeland, mostly the southern provinces of Guangdong and Fujian, introducing the indigenous people of the Malay Peninsula and northern Borneo to a range of ingredients now used by every ethnic group in Malaysia: noodles, bean sprouts, tofu and soy sauce. Their technique of stir-frying small portions of food in a little oil over very high heat in a conical frying pan called a wok was also widely adopted. In turn, Malaysia's Chinese

jungles, comes to its end in the peninsula known poetically to the ancient Greeks as the Golden Khersonese. This golden land, the Malay Peninsula, lies where the monsoons meet and, over the centuries, saw sailing ships arriving from the west from Arabia, India and, much later on, from Europe. From the east came Chinese junks, Siamese vessels and the inter-island sailing craft of the Buginese and Javanese from the Indonesian archipelago. The original people of the peninsula—known collectively as

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