The Great Ceviche Book, revised

The Great Ceviche Book, revised

Douglas Rodriguez

Language: English

Pages: 144

ISBN: 158008107X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Great Ceviche Book, revised

Douglas Rodriguez

Language: English

Pages: 144

ISBN: 158008107X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Great Ceviche Book is the definitive, authentic guide to this fresh vibrant cuisine.
 
Ceviche—fresh seafood cured in citrus—boasts lively, bright flavors along with a low-fat, high-protein healthiness. In this revised edition of The Great Ceviche Book, award-winning chef Douglas Rodriguez reminds us why he is the foremost Latin chef in America. You’ll find straightforward instructions and confidence-building advice to walk you through all the ceviche fundamentals: its basic formula of six ingredients, the four safety commandments, helpful kitchen equipment to have on hand, and serving suggestions to create beautiful presentations.

Rodriguez’s passionate take on the subject offers more than forty diverse ceviche recipes, from traditional dishes originating in Central and South America such as Chilean Sea Bass with Lemon Oil and Ecuadorian Shrimp, to recipes that draw on diverse ethnic influences such as Gingered Toro Tuna with Soy and Sesame. Chapters on tasty side dishes and helpful basics round out everything you need to know to make this simple yet sophisticated cuisine in your own kitchen. Rodriguez’s streamlined preparations allow home cooks to focus on the virtues of freshness and pure flavors.

The Ultimate Volumetrics Diet: Smart, Simple, Science-Based Strategies for Losing Weight and Keeping It Off

Ceviche: Peruvian Kitchen: Authentic Recipes for Lomo Saltado, Anticuchos, Tiraditos, Alfajores, and Pisco Cocktails

The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen

Tea: The Drink that Changed the World

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chopped fresh cilantro 4 green onions, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 1½ pounds skinless salmon fillet, cut into ¼-inch dice ½ red onion, thinly sliced into half-moons, for garnish In a nonreactive bowl, blend all the marinade ingredients. Add the salmon and gently toss. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Before serving, garnish with the red onion. sweet and spicy mackerel Most gastronomes speak disparagingly of mackerel, due to its reputation for having an

century, there was a steady stream of Japanese immigrants into Peru and Latin America, traveling there to work on farms. This influx of Japanese influence culminated in the country electing a Japanese president in 1990, Alberto Fujimori, who held office for ten years. In Latin America, the Japanese and their descendants, known as Nikkei, had a profound influence on local cultures and cuisines. This is very evident in ceviche and its many variations known today. The Nikkei “movement” in cuisine

seeded and diced 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh cilantro 3 dashes Tabasco sauce 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh cilantro for garnish In a nonreactive bowl, toss together the conch, lime juice, and salt. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to 3 hours. When ready to serve, gently toss the conch with the marinade ingredients and garnish with the chopped cilantro. mussels on the half shell

RECOMMENDED SOURCES OF SEAFOOD AND SPECIALTY ITEMS ATLANTA Harry’s Farmers Market alpharetta: 1180 Upper Hembree Road Roswell, GA 30076 (770) 664-6300 gwinnett: 2025 Satellite Point Duluth, GA 30136 (770) 416-6900 cobb: 70 Powers Ferry Road Marietta, GA 30067 (770) 578-4400 Star Provisions www.starprovisions.com 1198 Howell Mill Road NW Atlanta, GA 30318 (404) 365-0410 Whole Foods Market www.wholefoodsmarket.com 2111 Briarcliff Road NE Atlanta, GA 30329 (404) 634-7800

available bottled in Asian markets. Pummelo: The world’s largest citrus and a relative of the grapefruit, although with a thicker pith and skin. Pulp is uniquely crisp (similar to the seeds of a pomegranate) and sweeter and less acidic than grapefruit. Quinoa: (pronounced KEEN-wah) A tiny, ancient grain-like seed, first cultivated by the Incas and still grown extensively in the Andean region of South America. High in protein and nutrients. Used like rice or couscous. Saffron: Extremely

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