The History of Rome Volume 2 (Cambridge Library Collection - Classics)

The History of Rome Volume 2 (Cambridge Library Collection - Classics)

Theodor Mommsen

Language: English

Pages: 492

ISBN: 2:00275402

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The History of Rome Volume 2 (Cambridge Library Collection - Classics)

Theodor Mommsen

Language: English

Pages: 492

ISBN: 2:00275402

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The classical historian Theodor Mommsen (1817-1903) published his History of Rome between 1854 and 1856. His work was received with widespread acclaim by the scholarly community and the reading public. In 1902, in recognition of this monumental work, Mommsen was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature and acclaimed as 'the greatest living master of the art of historical writing'. Mommsen rejected traditional Enlightenment accounts, which glorified ancient Rome; instead, guided by a new and rigorous criticism of sources, he began the demythologisation of Roman history. In a vivacious and engaging style, using modern terms to express classical ideas, Mommsen drew bold parallels between the nineteenth century and classical Rome. This 1862 translation is based on the German third edition (1861). This monumental work became the enduring rival of Edward Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.
Volume 2 of The History of Rome extends from the unification of Italy to the subjugation of Carthage and the Greek States.

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300 elephants. They could not venture to fortify the dependent cities, and 396. 26 CARTHAGE. [Book III. were obliged to submit to the occupation of the towns and villages as well as the open country by any hostile army that landed in Africa—a thorough contrast to the state of Italy, where most of the subject towns'had retained their walls, and a chain of Eoman fortresses' commanded the whole peninsula. But on the fortification of the capital they expended all the resources of money and of

it was concluded. It might be that Eome was not yet meditating the conquest of Africa and was 'content with Italy ; but if the existence of the Carthaginian state depended on that contentment, the prospect was but a sorry one; and where was the security that the Eomans might not find it convenient, even with a. view to their Italian policy, to extirpate rather than reduce under subjection their African neighbour ? In short, Carthage could only regard the peace of 513 in War party the light of a

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defensive attitude, and the attempt of his successor to imitate him at Casilinum had failed in such a way as to afford a copious fund of ridicule to the scoffers of the city. It was wonderful that the Italian communities hadnot wavered, when Hannibal so palpably showed them the superiority of the Phoenicians and the nullity of Roman aid; but how long could they be expected to bear the burden of a double war, and to allow themselves to be plundered under the very eyes of the Roman troops and of

Macedonians ; partly that it might, in connection with the army of Nola, pillage the revolted Samnites, Lucanians, and Hirpinians. To give relief to these, Hannibal turned first against his most active opponent, Marcus Marcellus ; but the latter achieved under the walls of Nola no inconsiderable victory over the Punic army, and it was obliged to depart, without having cleared off the stain, from Campania for Arpi, in order at length to check the progress of the enemy's army in Apulia. Tiberius

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