The Mindful Way through Depression: Freeing Yourself from Chronic Unhappiness (purchase includes audio CD narrated by Jon Kabat-Zinn)

The Mindful Way through Depression: Freeing Yourself from Chronic Unhappiness (purchase includes audio CD narrated by Jon Kabat-Zinn)

J. Mark G. Williams DPhil

Language: English

Pages: 273

ISBN: 1593854498

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Mindful Way through Depression: Freeing Yourself from Chronic Unhappiness (purchase includes audio CD narrated by Jon Kabat-Zinn)

J. Mark G. Williams DPhil

Language: English

Pages: 273

ISBN: 1593854498

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


If you've ever struggled with depression, take heart. Mindfulness, a simple yet powerful way of paying attention to your most difficult emotions and life experiences, can help you break the cycle of chronic unhappiness once and for all. In The Mindful Way through Depression, four uniquely qualified experts explain why our usual attempts to "think" our way out of a bad mood or just "snap out of it" lead us deeper into the downward spiral. Through insightful lessons drawn from both Eastern meditative traditions and cognitive therapy, they demonstrate how to sidestep the mental habits that lead to despair, including rumination and self-blame, so you can face life's challenges with greater resilience. Jon Kabat-Zinn gently and encouragingly narrates the accompanying CD of guided meditations, making this a complete package for anyone seeking to regain a sense of hope and well-being.

See also the authors' Mindful Way Workbook, which provides step-by-step guidance for building your mindfulness practice in 8 weeks. Plus, mental health professionals, see also the authors' bestselling therapy guide: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression, Second Edition.

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events that naturally arise, stay for a while, and then fade of their own accord. This ever-so simple, yet challenging, shift in the way we relate to thoughts releases us from their control. For when we have thoughts such as “This unhappiness will always be with me” or “I am an unlovable person,” we don’t have to take them as realities. When we do, we succumb to endlessly struggling with them. The reality is that these ideas are mental events akin to weather patterns that our mind is generating

They tell us very little about the real state of ourselves or the world or the future. Negative thoughts are part of the landscape of depression. There is nothing personal about them. This alternative way of viewing such negative thoughts comes across particularly powerfully when people go through a mindfulness-based cognitive therapy program with others who, like them, have experienced multiple episodes of depression but are now relatively well. When they all answer “Yes—all of them” or

reduce their destructive effects. Then, during one practice period, she suddenly realized, “All this analysis that I try to do—it isn’t making it less scary, thinking about it like that. It’s making it more scary!” Intellectualizing and analyzing doesn’t work when low mood has been triggered. Remembering that thoughts are “just thoughts” is a wiser strategy. Through mindfulness meditation practice, Jade was catching a glimpse of the possibility of the freedom that comes when we are able to let

is diagnosed when someone experiences either of the first two symptoms in the following list, and at least four or more of the other symptoms, continuously over at least a two-week period and in a way that departs from normal functioning. Feeling depressed or sad most of the day Loss of interest or ability to derive pleasure from all or nearly all activities that were previously enjoyed Significant weight loss when not dieting, or weight gain, or a decrease or increase in appetite nearly every

doing and moving forward and practice, however brief it is by the clock, on a daily basis. Ultimately, mindfulness is not about time; it is about now. So even brief moments by the clock, if we are really present for them with awareness, in being mode, are profoundly reorienting and healing. However, to really know the landscape of our own mind and body, it is important to visit on a regular basis, or perhaps take up permanent residency, so to speak, rather than being a perpetual tourist. It may

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