The New Cider Maker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for Craft Producers

The New Cider Maker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for Craft Producers

Claude Jolicoeur

Language: English

Pages: 352

ISBN: 1603584730

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The New Cider Maker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for Craft Producers

Claude Jolicoeur

Language: English

Pages: 352

ISBN: 1603584730

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


All around the world, the public’s taste for fermented cider has been growing more rapidly than at any time in the past 150 years. And with the growing interest in locally grown and artisanal foods, many new cideries are springing up all over North America, often started up by passionate amateurs who want to take their cider to the next level as small-scale craft producers.

To make the very best cider―whether for yourself, your family, and friends or for market―you first need a deep understanding of the processes involved, and the art and science behind them. Fortunately, The New Cider Maker’s Handbook is here to help. Author Claude Jolicoeur is an internationally known, award-winning cider maker with an inquiring, scientific mind. His book combines the best of traditional knowledge and techniques with up-to-date, scientifically based practices to provide today’s cider makers with all the tools they need to produce high-quality ciders.

The New Cider Maker’s Handbook is divided into five parts containing:

  • An accessible overview of the cider making process for beginners;
  • Recommendations for selecting and growing cider-appropriate apples;
  • Information on juice-extraction equipment and directions on how to build your own grater mill and cider press;
  • A discussion of the most important components of apple juice and how these may influence the quality of the cider;
  • An examination of the fermentation process and a description of methods used to produce either dry or naturally sweet cider, still or sparkling cider, and even ice cider.

This book will appeal to both serious amateurs and professional cider makers who want to increase their knowledge, as well as to orchardists who want to grow cider apples for local or regional producers. Novices will appreciate the overview of the cider-making process, and, as they develop skills and confidence, the more in-depth technical information will serve as an invaluable reference that will be consulted again and again. This book is sure to become the definitive modern work on cider making.

A mechanical engineer by profession, Claude Jolicoeur first developed his passion for apples and cider after acquiring a piece of land on which there were four rows of old abandoned apple trees. He started making cider in 1988 using a “no-compromise” approach, stubbornly searching for the highest possible quality. Since then, his ciders have earned many awards and medals at competitions, including a Best of Show at the prestigious Great Lakes International Cider and Perry Competition (GLINTCAP).

Claude actively participates in discussions on forums like the Cider Digest, and is regularly invited as a guest speaker to events such as the annual Cider Days festival in western Massachusetts. He lives in Quebec City.

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this covers from the very dry category up to medium-sweet), Demi-sec: residual sugar between 28 and 42 g/L, Doux: more than 35 g/L residual sugar, but with an alcoholic strength of less than 3% ABV. In England the dry-medium-sweet categories are also used, but there is no consensus as to the boundaries between these. I have looked at the rules from three well-known competitions held in the southwest of England, and for two of them the break point between dry and medium was at SG 1.005, while it

which is the pressure outside the keg. You then need to set the pressure on the regulator to 1.59 atm, which is 23 psi. Actually, you would set the pressure a few psi higher and leave it on for a couple of days. To check if the carbonation is high enough, shut off the main valve from the tank, open the relief valve a second to let the pressure drop, and wait awhile until the pressure is stabilized. If this pressure is 23 psi, the desired level of carbonation is there. If not, it is necessary to

clear. If the cider hasn’t cleared four months after the fermentation has stopped and it has reached dryness, you might have some sort of haze. Fining might be required. See the article on cider troubles, chapter 16. A film yeast. If you see a thin, whitish film on the surface of the cider, it is probably a film yeast, which was caused by some air coming into contact with the cider. Check the airlock, as this is probably the culprit in letting air in. This is a quite minor problem. See the

farms of Somerset. It has also been planted more recently in intensive bush orchards, where its good productivity has been noted. Copas (2001) gives the following juice data: SG 1.051, TA 2.9 g/L, tannin 2.6 g/L. In America this variety is not as well known as some other English cider apples, but it has nonetheless been recommended by our experts for the Rocky Mountain and Great Lakes regions. Wickson This is a crab (or at any rate a diminutive, crablike apple) that was introduced in 1944 by

also seen some hydrometers sold in France that were calibrated for a reading on the top of the meniscus, but such hydrometers are not common. Figure 8.3. Reading an SG of 1.017 on a hydrometer. Temperature correction For a hydrometer that is calibrated to give the specific gravity, we would normally take the reading at the calibration temperature, which is written on the instrument. In North America it is usually 60°F, and the instruments that are from Europe may be calibrated at 15°C or 20°C.

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