The New York Times Book of New York: Stories of the People, the Streets, and the Life of the City Past and Present

The New York Times Book of New York: Stories of the People, the Streets, and the Life of the City Past and Present

James Barron, Mitchel Levitas

Language: English

Pages: 508

ISBN: 2:00225541

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The New York Times Book of New York: Stories of the People, the Streets, and the Life of the City Past and Present

James Barron, Mitchel Levitas

Language: English

Pages: 508

ISBN: 2:00225541

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This unique volume uncovers the most fascinating and compelling stories from The New York Times about the city the paper calls home.

More than 200 articles and an abundance of photographs, illustrations, maps, and graphs from the preeminent newspaper in the world take a look at the history and personality of the world's most influential city. Read firsthand accounts of the subway opening in 1904 and the day the Metrocard was introduced; the fall of Tammany Hall and recurring corruption in city politics; the Son of Sam murders; jazz clubs in the 1920s and legendary performances at the Fillmore East; baseball's Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier at Brooklyn's storied Ebbets Field in 1947; the 1977 and 2004 blackouts; the openings and closings of the city's most beloved restaurants; and much more. Not just a historical account, this is a fascinating, sometimes funny, and often moving look at how people in New York live, eat, travel, mourn, fight, love, and celebrate.

Organized by theme, the book includes original writings on all topics related to city life, including art, architecture, transportation, politics, neighborhoods, people, sports, business, food, and more. Includes articles from such well-known Times writers as Meyer Berger, Gay Talese, Anna Quindlen, Israel Shenker, Brooks Atkinson, Frank Rich, Ada Louise Huxtable, John Kieran, Russell Baker, and more. Special contributors who have written about New York for the Times include Paul Auster, Woody Allen, and E.B. White, among others.

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Brooklyn. “But I will take into account the injury of the dog.” He reduced her penalties; she smiled. With millions of parking summonses issued in New York City each year, some 5,000 people a day walk into one of the Parking Violations Bureau’s five “Help Centers”—one in each borough—and have a hearing on the spot. The traffic agent who wrote the ticket will not be there: it is just you and a judge waiting to be moved, or unmoved, by your word, your persuasiveness and any evidence you can

faces were concentrated in thought unavailable to anyone, perhaps, especially to themselves. The Return Of Andy Warhol By JOHN LEONARD | November 10, 1968 “Since I was shot, everything is such a dream to me. I don’t know what anything is about. Like I don’t even know whether or not I’m really alive or—whether I died. It’s sad. Like I can’t say hello or goodbye to people. Life is like a dream.” —ANDY WARHOL On a Sunday afternoon last month, there was a very nice picnic in a courtyard at 5

mavens. This change in party style is expressive of SoHo’s transformation from a low-rent district for artists to a playground of uptown chic. Ten years ago, for $100 a month, artists could live and work in 2,500 square feet of high-ceilinged lofts in this area south of Houston Street. Today, SoHo is no longer cheap. Lofts are co-op apartments which sell for as much as $150,000 to doctors and psychoanalysts. Some artists have stayed and accommodated themselves to the changes in their

Side. The truth, too shameful to admit, was that in 1995, at age 24, I bought an apartment in a neighborhood that I and everyone I knew considered bland, conformist and kind of a bore. My friends came up here only to be hospitalized or to visit their parents or grandmothers. I grew up on the Upper East Side. By the time I returned to the neighborhood after college, big-box stores had taken over 86th Street and everyone I knew, all my artist and writer friends, lived below 14th Street. I did,

State Pavilion, a crumbling relic of the 1964 World’s Fair that sits in the park, was named along with the other far-flung sites to the World Monuments Fund’s list of 100 endangered sites, which is released every two years. The pavilion, designed by Philip Johnson and familiar to drivers on the Grand Central Parkway for its three towers and open-air Tent of Tomorrow, made the list because it is in danger of collapse from rotting foundations, the group said. “It’s hard to see things that were

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