The Next Big Story: My Journey Through the Land of Possibilities

The Next Big Story: My Journey Through the Land of Possibilities

Soledad O'Brien, Rose Marie Arce

Language: English

Pages: 336

ISBN: 0451232844

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Next Big Story: My Journey Through the Land of Possibilities

Soledad O'Brien, Rose Marie Arce

Language: English

Pages: 336

ISBN: 0451232844

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


From top CNN anchor and special correspondent Soledad O'Brien comes a highly personal look at her biggest reporting moments from Hurricane Katrina, the tsunami in Southeast Asia, the devastating Haiti earthquake, and to the historic 2008 U.S. elections and high profile interviews with everyday Americans. Drawing on her own unique background as well as her experiences at the front lines of the most provocative issues in today's society, and from her work on the acclaimed documentaries Black in America and Latino in America, O'Brien offers her candid, clear-eyed take on where we are as a country and where we're going.

What emerges is both an inspiring message of hope and a glimpse into the heart and soul of one of America's most straight-talking reporters.

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suburbs of Boston. So I hop on the train from New York to Boston Sunday nights and move in with Maria until Wednesday. Brad is working constantly so we barely miss each other. Maria is a full-time professor at BU with the first five of her seven kids at home. I arrive exhausted, spent from being pregnant more than anything. Her kids surround me with their youthful exuberance and we play around in Maria’s big house with its oversized everything. I brush their hair and let them play with my makeup.

and its principles belong to you, good and bad. It’s what makes America special. It doesn’t matter how you look or speak; you get to be an American because you’re here. And I’m as much of an American as the eighth-grader or the photo store guy or anyone like them. I adopt their history and there’s nothing they can do about it. There is a large blue-green statue of a bull at a key intersection in Smithtown celebrating the town’s founding. I’ve driven past it a thousand times and more, but I only

debate we travel to a place much closer to the Canadian border with the United States than the Mexican border. Shenandoah, Pennsylvania, might be 1,800 miles from our southern frontier, but the issues surrounding the death of Luis Ramirez were as raw in Shenandoah as if the town sat in southern Arizona. As illegal immigrants from Latin America have moved into towns outside of the Southwest, the debate over their presence on U.S. soil has moved with them. The irony of Shenandoah’s situation is

can hardly reach him. My mind flashes to a news report. I’ve died because I went back for something. I can’t believe I’m thinking that way It feels real, like it happened. “Run, run!” There is blood spilling from the man’s head. A woman in scrubs falls by his side. She screams to everyone to keep running. I barely make it into the parking lot when the shaking finally, mercifully, suddenly, stops. No one says anything. There is wailing in the distance. The Haitians look terrified; the foreigners

justice and she has her own Smithtown. She has a shot at seeing her new baby grow up and get what she couldn’t have. I was given all the opportunities Corinne never got. I pledge to live my life aware of that truth, to refuse to rush by trouble, to stop and at least bear witness to what is happening to people like Corinne. I was fortunate enough to enjoy a childhood in Smithtown that gave me every resource possible to succeed in life. That means I have a responsibility to give back. That sounds

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