The Old Curiosity Shop: A Tale (2nd Edition)

The Old Curiosity Shop: A Tale (2nd Edition)

Charles Dickens, Norman Page, Hablot K. Browne, George Cattermole, Daniel Maclise, Samuel Williams

Language: English

Pages: 541

ISBN: 2:00182810

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Old Curiosity Shop: A Tale (2nd Edition)

Charles Dickens, Norman Page, Hablot K. Browne, George Cattermole, Daniel Maclise, Samuel Williams

Language: English

Pages: 541

ISBN: 2:00182810

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


With original illustrations by George Cattermole, Hablot K. Browne (Phiz), Daniel Maclise and Samuel Williams

Penguin Classics e-books give you the best possible editions of Charles Dickens's novels, including all the original illustrations, useful and informative introductions, the definitive, accurate text as it was meant to be published, a chronology of Dickens's life and notes that fill in the background to the book. The Old Curiosity Shop and the tale of Little Nell gripped the nation when it first appeared in 1841. Described as a 'tragedy of sorrows', it shows Nell uprooted from a secure and innocent childhood and cast into a world where evil takes many shapes, the most fascinating of which is the stunted, lecherous and demonic Quilp. Blending realism with non-realistic genres such as fairy-tale, allegory and pastoral, The Old Curiosity Shop contains some of Dickens most memorable comic and grotesque creations, including the dwarf Daniel Quilp, Dick Swiveller and Kit Nubbles.

Concerto to the Memory of an Angel

Confessions of an English Opium Eater

Faust, Part Two

The Intercept: A Jeremy Fisk Novel

The Currency of Paper

Les Faux-Monnayeurs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The text of the first edition in volume form, published in 1841, is substantially identical with the serial text except for the addition of two passages in chapters 1 and 4. The Cheap Edition of 1848 and other editions that appeared in Dickens’s lifetime embody no significant revisions to the 1841 text. The complete manuscript of the novel is in the Forster Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, as are the corrected proofs for a large portion of the second half of the novel.

spare the office; get as much out of it as you can – clerk’s motto – Eh, Mr Richard? Ha, ha!’ Mr Swiveller solemnly doffed the aquatic jacket, put on his coat, took down his hat from its peg, pocketed the letter, and departed. Directly he was gone, up rose Miss Sally Brass, and smiling sweetly at her brother (who nodded and smote his nose in return) withdrew also. Sampson Brass was no sooner left alone, than he set the office-door wide open, and establishing himself at his desk directly

to be out of humour with her. Bless you for a dear old lady. Here’s your health!’ ‘I am much obliged to you,’ returned the old woman, testifying by a certain restlessness in her hands a vehement desire to shake her matronly fist at her son-in-law. ‘Oh! I’m very much obliged to you!’ ‘Grateful soul!’ cried the dwarf. ‘Mrs Quilp.’ ‘Yes, Quilp,’ said the timid sufferer. ‘Help your mother to get breakfast, Mrs Quilp. I am going to the wharf this morning – the earlier, the better, so be quick.’

seemed to obtrude itself upon his mind that it was of no use tarrying there any longer. That the conviction was an unwelcome one, and that he was by no means willing to yield to it, was apparent from his reluctance to quit the spot; from the tardy steps with which he often left it, still looking over his shoulder at the same window; and from the precipitation with which he as often returned, when a fancied noise or the changing and imperfect light induced him to suppose it had been softly

was case-hardened, and would have smoked a small lime-kiln if anybody had treated him with it. Wherefore he only muttered a brief defiance of his master, and did as he was ordered. ‘Is it good, Brass, is it nice, is it fragrant, do you feel like the Grand Turk?’ said Quilp. Mr Brass thought that if he did, the Grand Turk’s feelings were by no means to be envied, but he said it was famous, and he had no doubt he felt very like that Potentate. ‘This is the way to keep off fever,’ said Quilp,

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