The Omega Diet: The Lifesaving Nutritional Program Based on the Best of the Mediterranean Diets

The Omega Diet: The Lifesaving Nutritional Program Based on the Best of the Mediterranean Diets

Artemis P. Simopoulos, Jo Robinson

Language: English

Pages: 400

ISBN: B003F76IZQ

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Omega Diet: The Lifesaving Nutritional Program Based on the Best of the Mediterranean Diets

Artemis P. Simopoulos, Jo Robinson

Language: English

Pages: 400

ISBN: B003F76IZQ

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The medically proven diet that restores your body's essential nutritional balance

"Good fats"--essential fatty acids--influence every aspect of our being, from the beating of our hearts to our ability to learn to remember. There are two types of essential fatty acids (EFAs), omega-6 and omega-3. The problem with our modern diet is that it contains far more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3s. This hidden imbalance makes us more vulnerable to heart disease, cancer, obesity, autoimmmune diseases, allergies, diabetes, and depression.

The Omega Diet is a natural, time-tested diet that balances the essential fatty acids in your diet. It is packed with delicious food that contain the "good" fats, including real salad dressing, cheese, eggs, fish--even the occasional chocolate dessert--and an abundance of antioxidant-rich fruits, vegetables, and legumes.

The Omega Diet provides:

  • seven simple dietary guidelines for optimal physical and mental health
  • a concise guide to the foods you need to restore your body's nutritional balance
  • a diet plan that lets you eat fat as you lose fat
  • fifty delicious recipes that are quick and easy to prepare
  • a comprehensive three-week menu to help you get started

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circulate in your bloodstream. Under certain conditions, the fibrinogen becomes entangled with the platelets and other elements, resulting in a thrombus, or clot. A recent survey showed that people with high levels of fibrinogen had five times the normal risk of heart attack, recurrent heart attack, and premature death. Omega-3 oils keep unwanted clots from forming in two ways. First, they make your platelets less “gluey,” making it less likely they will stick together. Second, they decrease the

* * * The Bottom Line Before a heart attack or stroke can occur, a number of changes have to take place within your cardiovascular system. Some of the changes are set in motion in your twenties or thirties. The more changes you can prevent, the lower your risk of a heart attack or stroke. The Omega Plan protects your cardiovascular system in a number of ways. Specifically, it has the potential to: Protect your artery linings, by reducing levels of homocysteine and blocking

them, and osteoclasts, which tear them down. As we age, the osteoclasts tend to outpace the osteoblasts, making our bones less dense—and more breakable. Osteoporosis—literally “porous bones”—afflicts tens of millions of Americans, resulting in short- and long-term disability and billions of dollars of medical costs. There is growing evidence from animal studies that following a diet such as The Omega Plan that is rich in antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids may help preserve bone density.

Lininger. Fish-oil fatty acid supplementation in active rheumatoid arthritis. Annals of Internal Medicine, 1987; 106(4):497–502. 6. Kremer, J. M. and S. Malcolm. Dietary fish oil and olive oil supplementation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 1990; 33(6):810–820. 7. Kremer, J.M.L., and A. David. Effects of high-dose fish oil on rheumatoid arthritis after stopping nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Arthritis & Rheumatism, 1995; 36(8):1107–1114. 8. Cleary, E. G.

with its high LNA content to compensate for the fact that Americans eat fewer green leafy vegetables, legumes, and walnuts than the Greeks, and rarely eat wild plants—all good sources of LNA, vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. 2. De Oliveira e Silva, E. R., C. E. Seidman, and J. L. Breslow. Effects of shrimp consumption on plasma lipoproteins. Amer J of Clinical Nutrition, 1996; 64:712–7. 3. Sauer, L. A. and R. T. Dauchy. The effect of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on 3H-thymidine

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