The Pepper Trail: History and Recipes from Around the World

The Pepper Trail: History and Recipes from Around the World

Jean Andrews

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 1574410709

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Pepper Trail: History and Recipes from Around the World

Jean Andrews

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 1574410709

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Andrews, who has been called “the first lady of Chile peppers,” “the godmother of the chile world,” as well as her own registered trademark “The Pepper Lady,” follows the spice trade and early movements of capsicums along the spice roads, through much of Turkey and the Middle East, Africa and Monsoon Asia (India, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Indonesia) plus the Szechuan and Hunan provinces in China and the Silk Route. This latest offering includes previously undiscovered facts, including the etymology of the word “cayenne.”

The first spice to be used by man, peppers are currently hot in Mexico, Guatemala, much of the Caribbean, most of Africa, parts of south America, India, Bhutan, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, southwestern China, the Balkans, the United States–Louisiana, Texas, and the Southwest–plus Korea.

A chapter on what makes a pepper a pepper includes detailed descriptions and illustrations of twenty-seven separate varieties of the Capsicum, as well as miscellaneous cultivars and detailed directions on working with fresh and dried peppers, including how to choose and use them, and how to care for them.

The recipes include those of such nationally known chefs as Mark Miller, Reed Clemons, Miguel Ravago, Stephen Pyles, Jon Jividen, Paula Lambert (Mozzarella Company), Robert del Grande, Pat Teepatiganond, Cecilia Chiang, Elmar E. Prambs, Jerry di Vecchio, Paul Prudhomme, Dean Fearing, Amal Naj, Justin Wilson, and John Ash, among many others.

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1½ teaspoons ground coriander seeds 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced ½ teaspoon sugar Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 cup long­grain rice cooked (3 cups) Pepitas, whole, and fresh cilantro sprigs for garnish Place the pepitas in a blender and process until completely ground. Add the tomatoes, onions, all peppers, cilantro, coriander seeds, garlic, sugar, salt, pepper and

during my "critical period" (footnote 2, page 227). In England during the Middle Ages, the Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) was called "turkey­cock," probably because it had been introduced to eastern Europe by the  Turks. Some writers have proposed that any large bird that spread its tail like a peafowl was called "turkey." Accordingly, the large, spreading American bird

soluble in alcohol. Again, this works on the skin, but caution must be noted when you drink it because we have already seen that alcohol penetrates    Page 57 the barriers nature has provided to protect your stomach lining—as well as being intoxicating. For your burning mouth, try using vodka as a mouthwash and gargle,  then spit it out—great for the dedicated driver. Cheap vodka works just as well!

the flavor and food value of the pepper as the nutrients dissolve in the water. Save the soaking water for sauces and soups (remarks under mulato [page 75]). The three robust, dried Mexican chiles—ancho, mulato, pasilla—are ground separately and made into a paste which is sold in little blocks that look rather like  baking chocolate. This paste is known as pisado chile—not pasado (page 72). Mulato (Dried) Capsicum annuum var. annuum Linné  Dark brown COLOR: SHAPE: SIZE:

A thick, spicy, sweet, dark brownish­red Chinese condiment made of soy bean flour, garlic, chillies, ginger, and sugar, used in stir­fried dishes, on mu shu pork, and  in Chinese barbecue sauce. It is sold in cans or bottles at Oriental food stores, and will keep for months in a tightly closed jar in the refrigerator. There is no substitute. Nam Prik

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