The Rabelais Encyclopedia

The Rabelais Encyclopedia

Language: English

Pages: 320

ISBN: 0313310343

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Rabelais Encyclopedia

Language: English

Pages: 320

ISBN: 0313310343

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The French humanist Rabelais (ca. 1483-1553) was the greatest French writer of the Renaissance and one of the most influential authors of all time. His Gargantua and Pantagruel, written in five books between 1532 and 1553, rivals the works of Shakespeare and Cervantes in terms of artistry, complexity of ideas and expression, and historical importance. Rabelais is read in numerous courses in French Literature, Renaissance Studies, and Western Civilization, and his writings continue to attract the attention of scholars and general readers alike. The first work of its kind, this encyclopedia is a comprehensive guide to his life and writings.

Included are several hundred alphabetically arranged entries by expert contributors. These entries discuss his characters, his overt and veiled references to historical and Renaissance figures and events, his literary and philosophical allusions, his major themes, and the key events and influences that shaped his career. The entries cover such topics as education, religion, censors and censorship, humanism, death, and warfare. Entries cite works for further reading, and the encyclopedia closes with a selected, general bibliography.

A Brontë Family Chronology (Author Chronologies)

Doom of the Darksword (The Darksword Trilogy, Book 2)

Dissident Gardens

First Among Equals

Des femmes disparaissent

Blue Boy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

order, introducing each anecdote with temporally imprecise adverbial phrases such as “one time,” “another time,” or “one day.” There is no effort of concatenation or consecution. Since all these anecdotes involve special props or accessories, the narrator also describes Panurge’s cloak or “saye,” which has more than twenty-six pockets full of tricks. The inventory of the pockets in turn yields a series of brief anecdotes, each drawn from a different pocket of Panurge’s cloak. Apparently, every

Universitaires de France, 1998). Kathleen Perry Long M ` (1469–1527) A MACHIAVELLI, NICCOLO Florentine bureaucrat often credited with creating political science as an autonomous discipline. His Il principe or The Prince, written between 1513 and 1521 in an effort to persuade Lorenzo de’ Medici’s son Piero to take him into his service, and his more substantial Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy (Discorsi sopra la prima deca di Tito Livio), circulated widely in manuscript, though they were

James K. Farge, Orthodoxy and Reform in Early Reformation France. The Faculty of Theology of Paris, 1500–1543 (Leiden: L. J. Brill, 1985); Jean Larmat, “Picrochole, est-il Noe¨l Beda?” ER 8 (1969): 13–25; Erika Rummel, Erasmus and His 20 Body, Representations of Catholic Critics II: 1523–36 (Nieuwkoop: De Graaf, 1989). James K. Farge BODY, REPRESENTATIONS OF A subject matter that constitutes the basic framework of the whole of Rabelais’s novels and figures in many Renaissance works. The

so that the attempt of some modern critics to find order in it seems to me misguided. Bude´ quotes some ancient jokes (facetiae) and would like to be thought a “Democritus gelasinus” (792), but Rabelais’s debt to him is more obvious than that and has yet to be thoroughly explored. Bude´ supplied him with some important names: Panurgus (239–40), Thalamegos (654), islands of the blest called Macaron (750), as well as several terms used in passing (Coraxian sheep, Pastophores, Bude´, Guillaume

Saint Sebastian. His judgment is harsh, claiming that Church leaders who advocate pilgrimage as a means of forestalling calamity blaspheme the just and saintly by reducing them to mere devils who only make trouble for humans. He advises the pilgrims not to undertake useless trips and, rather, to stay home, work, and take care of their families and to live 74 Evangelism as “the good apostle Saint Paul taught you,” an allusion to Ephesians 4–5 (G 45). Rabelais plumbs medieval anticlerical

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