The Routledge Companion to Religion and Popular Culture (Routledge Religion Companions)

The Routledge Companion to Religion and Popular Culture (Routledge Religion Companions)

Language: English

Pages: 602

ISBN: 0415638666

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Routledge Companion to Religion and Popular Culture (Routledge Religion Companions)

Language: English

Pages: 602

ISBN: 0415638666

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Religion and popular culture is a fast-growing field that spans a variety of disciplines. This volume offers the first real survey of the field to date and provides a guide for the work of future scholars. It explores:

  • key issues of definition and of methodology
  • religious encounters with popular culture across media, material culture and space, ranging from videogames and social networks to cooking and kitsch, architecture and national monuments
  • representations of religious traditions in the media and popular culture, including important non-Western spheres such as Bollywood

This Companion will serve as an enjoyable and informative resource for students and a stimulus to future scholarly work.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy: Fear and Trembling in Sunnydale (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Japanamerica: How Japanese Pop Culture Has Invaded the U.S.

Game of Thrones and Philosophy: Logic Cuts Deeper Than Swords (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series)

The Forgotten Village: Life in a Mexican Village

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Religion and Democracy in America, Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. Niebuhr, H.R. (1951) Christ and Culture, New York: Harper and Row. Persley, N.H. (2007) “A timeline of hip hop history,” in M. Hess (ed.), Icons of Hip Hop: An Encyclopedia of the Movement, Music, and Culture, Westport, CT: Greenwood, xxi–xxx. Pinsky, M.I. (2001) The Gospel According to the Simpsons: The Spiritual Life of the World’s Most Animated Family, Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press. ——(2007) The

There are also different kinds or modes of listening, as Douglas observes: informational or “flat” listening to glean the facts, almost as if reading a flat page; dimensional listening, as when you mentally locate yourself in the midst of a crowd, a theater, or an athletic stadium and are following action in three dimensions; and associational listening, when you connect what you’re hearing to specific personal memories. Douglas, commenting on how listening has its own set of discursive practices or

radio and telegraph “Q code” for sending messages in minimal signals). It would take a few years before radio became something more than the dialtwiddling of amateur hobbyists, but by the mid-1920s it was already apparent that in the United States, at least, radio would not be a government-owned utility but rather a regulated market, licensing slices of the radio spectrum for commercial use. The Radio Acts of 1927 and 1934 established the regulatory standard of “the public interest, convenience

presupposing a baseline of respect for songs like “Blowing in the Wind.” In this context, one could write a song describing oneself (the song’s protagonist) giving a sermon so eloquent that listeners (within the lyric) are inspired with heroic resolve and rush off to save the world. Outside this lyric, actual listeners may divide. Some may rush off to save the world, but others may be disgusted by the song’s preaching, or gratified by what they interpret as a satire of do-gooders, or alarmed by the

thus by extension a less interesting and insightful one. Conclusion Recall our opening question about how to drink from a fire hose. Working on this chapter, I have often felt that any linear argument about what music does would break on the rocks of the subtleties we have considered. Yet in no way does this make music’s power—when it takes deep root in listeners—any less significant. We have been thinking about one of the most compelling and motivating of all human experiences, expressed in forms

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