The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist's Quest for What Makes Us Human

The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist's Quest for What Makes Us Human

V. S. Ramachandran

Language: English

Pages: 384

ISBN: 0393340627

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist's Quest for What Makes Us Human

V. S. Ramachandran

Language: English

Pages: 384

ISBN: 0393340627

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


"A profound intriguing and compelling guide to the intricacies of the human brain." ―Oliver Sacks

In this landmark work, V. S. Ramachandran investigates strange, unforgettable cases―from patients who believe they are dead to sufferers of phantom limb syndrome. With a storyteller’s eye for compelling case studies and a researcher’s flair for new approaches to age-old questions, Ramachandran tackles the most exciting and controversial topics in brain science, including language, creativity, and consciousness. 45 illustrations

The PTSD Workbook for Teens: Simple, Effective Skills for Healing Trauma (Instant Help Book for Teens)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

different ways, as if it were above you or below you. FIGURE 2.2 This picture has not been Photoshopped! It was taken with an ordinary camera from the special viewing point that makes the Ames room work. The fun part of this illusion comes when you have two people walk to opposite ends of the room: It looks for all the world as if they are standing just a few feet apart from each other and one of them has grown giant, with his head brushing the ceiling, while the other has shrunk to the size of

it can be tested experimentally. As we saw earlier, when you look at something that‘s emotionally evocative—a tiger, your lover, or indeed, your mother—your amygdala signals your hypothalamus to prepare your body for action. This fight-or-flight reaction is not all or nothing; it operates on a continuum. A mildly, moderately, or profoundly emotional experience elicits a mild, moderate, or profound autonomic reaction, respectively. And part of these continuous autonomic reactions to experience is

Since Rizzolatti’s discovery, other types of mirror neurons have been found. Researchers at the University of Toronto were recording from cells in the anterior cingulate in conscious patients who were undergoing neurosurgery. Neurons in this area have long been known to respond to physical pain. On the assumption that such neurons respond to pain receptors in the skin, they are often called sensory pain neurons. Imagine the head surgeon’s astonishment when he found that the sensory pain neuron he

they were experiencing. By the same token, one could monitor mu waves on an autistic child‘s scalp and display them on a screen in front of her, perhaps in the guise of a simple thought-controlled video game, to see if she can somehow learn to suppress them. Assuming her mirror-neuron function is weak or dormant rather than absent, this kind of exercise might boost her ability to see through to the intentionality of others, and bring her a step closer to joining the social world that swirls

specific emotions. (Remember Michael Jackson?) FIGURE 7.7 Dancing stone nymph from Rajasthan, India, eleventh century. Does it stimulate mirror neurons? The relevance of the peak-shift law to caricatures and to the human body is obvious, but how about other kinds of art?2 Can we even begin to approach Van Gogh, Rodin, Gustav Klimt, Henry Moore, or Picasso? What can neuroscience tell us about abstract and semiabstract art? This is where most theories of art either fail or start invoking

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