The Under Dog and Other Stories

The Under Dog and Other Stories

Agatha Christie

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: 0440192285

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Under Dog and Other Stories

Agatha Christie

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: 0440192285

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Agatha Christie: Featuring Hercule Poirot. A collection of stories featuring Hercule Poirot. They include: The Under Dog. The Plymouth Express. The Affair at the Victory Ball. The Market Basing Mystery. The Lemesurier Inheritance. The Cornish Mystery. The King of Clubs. The Submarine Plans. The Adventure of the Clapham Cook. From the inside front cover: A world where an innocent young man will die unless a killer who has committed the perfect crime is caught...a world where the trail of a disappearing cook leads into a bubbling cauldron of deception and death... a world where the heir to a family legacy of hideous horror desperately tries to escape his fate...a world where life can violently end and love turn to terror in the blink of an eye and the plunge of a knife...This is the world in which Hercule Poirot is perfectly at home as he matches wits and nerves with nine of the most fearsome foes he has ever had to hunt-and demonstrates more enthrallingly than ever before that evil does not pay when Poirot is at hand for the final reckoning... From the back cover: The Terror Team. The one and only Hercule Poirot had never been bested in the game of crime and punishment-but now he faced the most lethal lineup ever to try to break his winning streak into bloody bits. Nine perverse puzzles, each more perplexing than the last. Nine cunning culprits, masters of murder and menace, deceit and disappearance. Nine paths of peril, each leading to a startling solution. Nine new proofs positive that no matter what the odds against him, Hercule Poirot is unbeatable as the greatest detective of them all...

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White Spot

The Consumer

The Lottery and Other Stories

The Turning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“you can tell me, Lady Astwell, why you suspect Owen Trefusis.” “I have told you I know—that’s all.” “Unfortunately, that is not enough,” said Poirot drily. “Cast your mind back to the fatal evening, Madame. Remember each detail, each tiny happening. What did you notice or observe about the secretary? I, Hercule Poirot, tell you there must have been something.” Lady Astwell shook her head. “I hardly noticed him at all that evening,” she said, “and I certainly was not thinking of him.” “Your

She’d been ten years in her last place. Eliza Dunn, her name was.” “And you had had—no disagreement with her on the Wednesday?” “None whatsoever. That’s what makes it all so queer.” “How many servants do you keep, madame?” “Two. The house-parlourmaid, Annie, is a very nice girl. A bit forgetful and her head full of young men, but a good servant if you keep her up to her work.” “Did she and the cook get on well together?” “They had their ups and downs, of course—but on the whole, very well.”

well-polished brass knockers on the doors. We rang the bell at No. 88, and the door was opened by a neat maid with a pretty face. Mrs. Todd came out in the hall to greet us. “Don’t go, Annie,” she cried. “This gentleman’s a detective and he’ll want to ask you some questions.” Annie’s face displayed a struggle between alarm and a pleasurable excitement. “I thank you, madame,” said Poirot bowing. “I would like to question your maid now—and to see her alone, if I may.” We were shown into a

“Were those two on good terms with each other?” Mr. Simpson said he couldn’t say, he was sure. He supposed so. “Well, we get nothing of interest there, mon ami,” said Poirot as we left the house. Our departure had been delayed by a burst of vociferous repetition from Mrs. Todd, who repeated everything she had said that morning at rather greater length. “Are you disappointed?” I asked. “Did you expect to hear something?” Poirot shook his head. “There was a possibility, of course,” he said.

an employer any minute by forfeiting a month’s wages. Your mistress will understand in view of the circumstances. The difficulty is time! It is imperative that you should catch the 11.05 from King’s Cross to the north. I can advance you ten pounds or so for the fare, and you can write a note at the station to your employer. I will take it to her myself and explain the whole circumstances.’ I agreed, of course, and an hour later I was in the train, so flustered that I didn’t know whether I was on

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