The Wondrous Story of Anesthesia

The Wondrous Story of Anesthesia

Language: English

Pages: 944

ISBN: 1461484405

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

The Wondrous Story of Anesthesia

Language: English

Pages: 944

ISBN: 1461484405

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Edited and written by an international "who's who" of more than 100 authors, including anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists, bench scientists, a surgeon, and representatives of industry, this text provides a comprehensive history of anesthesia, unique in its focus on the people and events that shaped the specialty around the world, particularly during the past 70 years when anesthesia emerged from empiricism and developed into a science-based practice.

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Reprise The 1990s advanced safety, control and understanding of clinical anesthesia. Two new, poorly soluble inhaled anesthetics, sevoflurane and desflurane allowed a more precise control over the anesthetic state. Sevoflurane did so without cardiorespiratory stimulation. Both protected the heart from hypoxia. An older anesthetic, isoflurane, could reverse mental depression. We learned that all these anesthetics acted on central pattern generators in the ventral spinal cord to make patients

Although demanding, the future is bright. Part II Individual Stories Surgery Before and After the Discovery of Anesthesia 15 William Silen and Elizabeth A. M. Frost Summary Long before the advent of anesthesia, operations relied on a detailed knowledge of anatomy gained by dissection of the dead. Morton’s demonstration of ether anesthesia on 16 Oct 1846 made planned surgery possible, that is surgery in a silent motionless patient. Thus began the era of the great surgeons of Europe

the patient” [19]. One bit of circumstantial evidence further supports the credibility of this explanation—that no one believed that anesthesia could exist—as the most plausible reason for the delay in the discovery of anesthesia. The immediate, worldwide acceptance of anesthesia suggests that the first five explanations carried little weight. As Snow noted (p. 19) [20], “No great improvement in the practice of medicine was probably ever established so readily as the inhalation of ether for the

required 4 months training. State nurse anesthetist societies arose concurrently in the US (e.g., Ohio first in 1931). In 1933, the National Association of Nurse Anesthetists published a report (now the ‘AANA Journal’) of their first annual meeting. And NANA president Fife proposed establishing a national board examination for nurse anesthetists. Before World War II, the American Board of Surgery pressured the NANA to meet with the ABS and the American Board of Anesthesiology, to consider having

Greene, intoned that this evening he would reveal the First Manny Papper Awardee for Excellence in Research. “Would Dr. Papper please stand for the Award?” Papper hesitantly rose. Hornbein and I strode up from behind and clapped the epaulets onto his shoulder. Ruefully, Papper commented that he “should have kept his mouth shut.” This was the first and last Manny Papper Award. The AUA has grown, with 613 active and 176 senior members as of 2012 (Email from Annie DeVries, AUA Administrative

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