There's Not an App for That: Mobile User Experience Design for Life

There's Not an App for That: Mobile User Experience Design for Life

Simon Robinson, Gary Marsden, Matt Jones

Language: English

Pages: 448

ISBN: 0124166911

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

There's Not an App for That: Mobile User Experience Design for Life

Simon Robinson, Gary Marsden, Matt Jones

Language: English

Pages: 448

ISBN: 0124166911

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


There’s Not an App for That will make your work stand out from the crowd. It walks you through mobile experiences, and teaches you to evaluate current UX approaches, enabling you to think outside of the screen and beyond the conventional. You’ll review diverse aspects of mobile UX: the screens, the experience, how apps are used, and why they’re used. You’ll find special sections on "challenging your approach", as well as a series of questions you can use to critique and evaluate your own designs. Whether the authors are discussing real-world products in conjunction with suggested improvements, showcasing how existing technologies can be put together in unconventional ways, or even evaluating "far out" mobile experiences of the future, you’ll find plenty of practical pointers and action items to help you in your day-to-day work.

  • Provides you with new and innovative ways to think about mobile design
  • Includes future mobile interfaces and interactions, complete with real-world, applied information that teaches you how today’s mobile services can be improved
  • Illustrates themes from existing systems and apps to show clear paths of thought and development, enabling you to better design for the future

The Architecture of Light: Recent Approaches to Designing with Natural Light

Architectural Tiles: Conservation and Restoration

Extreme Weather Hits Home: Protecting Your Buildings from Climate Change

Design Thinking Research: Building Innovators (Understanding Innovation)

Thoughts on Interaction Design (2nd Edition)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

themes from the disruptive problems that we’ve been exploring. Then, we’ll turn to think more generally about what might be possible if some of the research prototypes we’ve seen turn into commercial reality. No time like the present If you were to start to apply the themes from this book to your designs right now, what approach should you adopt? In each chapter of this book we’ve given a raft of examples of existing ways of operating that can be changed—apps, services, and tools that

sensors, motion detectors, and output devices allowing the devices to respond through lights, vibrations, and sound. The researchers who developed the system are using it to better understand how people can express themselves and interact with others through touch interactions: ▪ Touch sensors respond to a wide variety of stimuli, pointing to opportunities that go way beyond the current limited vocabularies of touch in today’s mobile devices. ▪ The surface responds to taps, pats, glides (what

devices and services as we move through places and meet people. We’ll be thinking about the mobile as a wand to explore these perspectives. The wand is a useful metaphor because it encourages us to think about the virtuoso dexterity in interaction we think is missing from other heads-up approaches and to imagine how wielding it might create dramatic transformations of both physical and digital experiences. Wands might also remind you of the Harry Potter series of books. You might even remember

finger across the screen on systems that do not support these actions, and for that matter, waving hands in front of sinks that use old-fashioned handles, not infrared sensors, to dispense water.” Don Norman As with the video study, the researchers found that participants were uncomfortable doing the gestures when they were observed. However, the discomfort was only in the context where they were on display to bystanders over a longer period of time—e.g., sitting opposite someone in an

a cheap alternative to voice calls, various studies (such as one by Alex Taylor of Microsoft Research and colleagues on teenage “gift” giving), show that these asynchronous systems allow communication that we value in different ways. For example, important texts or images can be stored on a handset and cherished as a gift, in a way that voice calls cannot. Figure 16.1 Back to the future: Matt using a forerunner of the popular Personal Digital Assistants that become prevalent in the 1990s. Apps

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