This Just In: What I Couldn't Tell You on TV

This Just In: What I Couldn't Tell You on TV

Bob Schieffer

Language: English

Pages: 464

ISBN: 0425194337

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

This Just In: What I Couldn't Tell You on TV

Bob Schieffer

Language: English

Pages: 464

ISBN: 0425194337

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Bob Schieffer started his reporting career in Texas when he was barely old enough to buy a beer, joined CBS News in 1969, and became one of the few correspondents ever to have covered all four major Washington beats: the White House, the Pentagon, the State Department, and Capitol Hill. Over the past four decades, he's seen it all-and now he's sharing the after-hours tales only his colleagues know.

Thinking Clearly: Cases in Journalistic Decision-Making

News Junkie

The Best American Sports Writing 2014

Compassion Fatigue: How the Media Sell Disease, Famine, War and Death

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

more important, he recognized that news should be insulated from commercial pressures both inside and outside the company. Unfortunately, Taylor began to attract the kind of favorable attention that made Paley nervous. “Mr. Paley was very attentive to what his friends said,” Taylor told me. “One of them said to him, ‘That Arthur Taylor certainly seems to be doing quite well,’ and that was the death sentence for me.” Others who found too much of the spotlight falling on them would suffer

winner before your competitors do, the temptation to take risks can only increase. And when one network analyst called the key states on election night 2000, the other networks naturally followed. Everyone denies that it worked that way, but when you examine the minutes, sometimes seconds, that separated the calls, even I as a network partisan find that hard to believe. In the days after the 2000 debacle, CBS News President Andrew Heyward ordered an in-house investigation to determine what had

felt snap brim. It was the standard uniform for police reporters, for one reason: it made it easier for them to pass themselves off as detectives. We had an informal code of ethics then; we never lied about who we were. But if people mistook us for the police, that was their problem, not ours. If they thought they were giving confidential information to an investigator, well, that was their problem, too. As we understood the First Amendment, everyone had a right to talk to the Star-Telegram, even

city room, the confusion was worse than ever. By now, a dozen Star-Telegram reporters were on the scene in Dallas, but when they called in, there was no one on the city desk to answer the phones and take down the stories they were trying to call in. I hadn’t even removed my hat when I settled behind a typewriter and picked up one of the ringing phones. In all my years as a reporter, I would never again take a call like that one. A woman’s voice asked if we could spare anyone to give her a ride

Oswald’s mother to George W. Bush—and the old pro, Bob Schieffer, himself.” —David S. Broder The Washington Post “On paper, Schieffer comes across pretty much the way he does on television—as a straight-talking, common-sensical, and good-natured fellow.” —St. Louis Post-Dispatch “A work of understatement and self-deprecating humor, honesty, and humility.” —The Sunday Oregonian “Bob Schieffer has always been able to dig up more of what really goes on in Washington than the rest of us, and we

Download sample

Download